Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Gulping down coffee to stay awake at night delays the body's natural surge of the sleep hormone melatonin. Hayato D./Flickr hide caption

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Hayato D./Flickr

Caffeine At Night Resets Your Inner Clock

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The Antarctic ice sheet stores more than half of Earth's fresh water. Scientists wondered how much of it would melt if people burned all the fossil fuels on the planet. UPI /Landov hide caption

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UPI /Landov

What Would Happen If We Burned Up All Of Earth's Fossil Fuels?

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National Geographic paleoartist John Gurche used fossils from a South African cave to reconstruct the face of Homo naledi, the newest addition to the genus Homo. Photo by Mark Thiessen/National Geographic hide caption

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Photo by Mark Thiessen/National Geographic

South African Cave Yields Strange Bones Of Early Human-Like Species

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A child suffering from dengue fever lies in a bed in the isolation ward of a Rawalpindi, Pakistan, hospital in November 2013. There is no treatment for dengue, whose symptoms include fever, severe joint pain, headaches and bleeding. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Muhammed Muheisen/AP

An impala strikes a pose under a forest canopy in Zimbabwe. Morkel Erasmus/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Morkel Erasmus/Getty Images/Gallo Images

Tree Counter Is Astonished By How Many Trees There Are

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Delegates took their seats during the plenary session at the Bonn climate change conference on March 10, 2014. Negotiations resume this week; by the end of the year, the U.N. hopes to have forged a new global agreement. UNclimatechange/Flickr hide caption

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UNclimatechange/Flickr

How Are U.N. Climate Talks Like A Middle School? Cliques Rule

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Male and female tungara frogs. Among these frogs, the guy with the best call usually wins the gal — except when you throw a third-choice loser into the mix. Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life hide caption

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Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life

Froggy Went A-Courtin', But Lady Frogs Chose Second-Best Guy Instead

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How Dorothy Parker's Ashes Ended Up In Baltimore

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A brown bear in its natural habitat. Wildlife ecologists in Minnesota found that black bears in their study experienced an increase in heart rate when buzzed by drones. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Drones Increase Heart Rates Of Wild Bears. Too Much Stress?

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A juvenile California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides). Michael LaBarbera/Nature hide caption

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Michael LaBarbera/Nature

Octopus Genome Offers Insights Into One Of Ocean's Cleverest Oddballs

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Astronomers Present New Research On The Aging Universe

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Can you guess which eyes belong to what animal? Top row, from left: cuttlefish, lion, goat. Bottom row, from left: domestic cat, horse, gecko. Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr hide caption

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Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr

Eye Shapes Of The Animal World Hint At Differences In Our Lifestyles

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Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

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How 3-D Printing Helps Scientists Understand Bird Behavior

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Life reconstruction of Wendiceratops pinhorn. Danielle Dufault/PLOS ONE hide caption

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Danielle Dufault/PLOS ONE

Scientists Discover One Of The Oldest Horned Dinosaurs

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