Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Stories By

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

A goldenrod midge maggot begins to form a loop. Reproduced/adapted with permission of Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley, G. M., Wise, M. J., Harrison, J. S., Sutton, G. P., Kuo, C. and Patek, S. N., 2019, Journal of Experimental Biology, volume 222, doi:10.1242/jeb.201129 hide caption

toggle caption
Reproduced/adapted with permission of Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley, G. M., Wise, M. J., Harrison, J. S., Sutton, G. P., Kuo, C. and Patek, S. N., 2019, Journal of Experimental Biology, volume 222, doi:10.1242/jeb.201129

Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/749878138/749933016" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the U.S., firearms kill more people through suicide than homicide. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How The CDC's Reluctance To Use The 'F-Word' — Firearms — Hinders Suicide Prevention

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/738533533/749501046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actual scientific research on beards is, regrettably, scant. However, researchers now know how beards are perceived by one important group of people: children. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maskot/Getty Images

Kids See Bearded Men As Strong — But Unattractive, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/746616246/747170742" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sharks Like To Hang Out, But Their Spots Often Overlap With Commercial Fishers'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/745392535/745392546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Indian fishermen pull up a shark from a boat for sale at a harbor in Chennai in June 2018. Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images

A Study Confirms That Laugh Tracks Make Jokes Seem Funnier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/744335651/744335652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NASA Moves Forward With Plans For Multi-Billion-Dollar Moon Rocket

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741046296/741047623" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Buzz Aldrin (left) practices collecting a sample while Neil Armstrong photographs during a training session before the Apollo 11 mission. The Apollo 11 astronauts returned with about 50 pounds of material, including 50 rocks. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

Moon Rocks Still Awe, And Scientists Hope To Get Their Hands On More

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/736212760/739643826" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The International Space Station is reflected in the visor of Expedition 59 flight engineer David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

As NASA Aims For The Moon, An Aging Space Station Faces An Uncertain Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/734474121/739288325" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michigan State University doctoral student Mike Morrison has a redesign for scientific posters to spell out their main point in big, easy-to-read letters. Courtesy of Mike Morrison hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Mike Morrison

To Save The Science Poster, Researchers Want To Kill It And Start Over

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/729314248/731795210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/727653152/729390585" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rich Isaacson, seen in his backyard in Pentagon City, Va., wrote his thesis on gravitational waves and says he always thought their existence would be proved sometime during his career. But he didn't realize that trying to see them would become his career. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Billion-Dollar Gamble: How A 'Singular Hero' Helped Start A New Field In Physics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/723326933/724747984" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Asteroid Simulation Reveals How Well Earth's Planetary Defenses Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/720097363/720097364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript