Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

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Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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An artist's rendering shows NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft descending toward the asteroid Bennu to collect a sample of the asteroid's surface. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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Matt Kasson

A Disturbing Twinkie That Has, So Far, Defied Science

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

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Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna have won the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their gene editing technique. Here, they are honored at the Breakthrough Prize award ceremony at the NASA Ames Research Center in California in 2014. Peter Barreras/Invision/AP hide caption

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Peter Barreras/Invision/AP

The winners of the Nobel Prizes in science have been overwhelmingly white and male, raising questions about whether the prizes can change with the times. Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

The Nobels Overwhelmingly Go to Men — This Year's Prize For Medicine Was No Exception

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Images from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory highlight the appearance of the sun at solar minimum (left, December 2019) versus solar maximum (right, April 2014). NASA hide caption

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NASA

The images used to create this view of Venus were acquired by the Mariner 10 craft on Feb. 7 and 8, 1974. Decades after the Mariner 2 flew by the planet in 1962, much about the planet remains unknown. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A Possible Sign Of Life Right Next Door To Earth, On Venus

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An STS-125 crew member onboard the space shuttle Atlantis snaps a still photo of the Hubble Space Telescope following grapple of the giant observatory by the shuttle. Johnson Space Center/NASA hide caption

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Johnson Space Center/NASA

The Hubble Space Telescope Still Works Great — Except When It Doesn't

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This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or virion. Frederick Murphy/CDC hide caption

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Frederick Murphy/CDC

Flu Season Looms And Scientists Wonder How Flu And COVID-19 Might Mix

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Where Did Earth's Water Come From?

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The Pacific Ocean from space. In both liquid and frozen form, water covers most of the Earth's surface, and there's been a debate among scientists about where all the water originated. Stocktrek Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stocktrek Images/Getty Images

Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

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People wait for a flu vaccine in May in Manaus, Brazil. The flu season had a surprisingly low count of influenza cases in the Southern Hemisphere, and researchers are trying to figure out the role coronavirus precautions might have played. Andre Coelho/Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Coelho/Getty Images

Coronavirus Safety Precautions Make Influenza Nearly Disappear In Southern Hemisphere

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A 130 degree temperature was recorded Sunday in Death Valley National Park, Calif. Now a committee of scientists is working to verify this temperature, which might turn out to be one of the hottest ever recorded. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images