Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

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Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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The sun, illustration. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Probe Gets Close To The Sun — Finds Rogue Plasma Waves And Flipping Magnetic Fields

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The Cambria factory in Minnesota manufactures slabs of engineered quartz for kitchen and bathroom countertops. If businesses don't follow worker protection rules, cutting these slabs to fit customers' kitchens can release lung-damaging silica dust. Cambria hide caption

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Cambria

'There's No Good Dust': What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

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What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

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Samples of Silestone, a countertop material made of quartz. Cutting the material releases dangerous silica dust that can damage people's lungs if the exposure to the dust is not properly controlled. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

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Common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus), such as this group day-roosting in a cave in Mexico, can form cooperative, friendship-like social relationships. B.G. Thomson/Science Source hide caption

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B.G. Thomson/Science Source

For These Vampires, A Shared Blood Meal Lets 'Friendship' Take Flight

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3 Researchers Win Nobel Prize In Chemistry For Work With Lithium-Ion Batteries

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3 Win Chemistry Nobel For Development Of Lithium-Ion Batteries

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A colored X-ray of the lungs of a patient with silicosis, a type of pneumoconiosis. The yellow grainy masses in the lungs are areas of scarred tissue and inflammation. CNRI/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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CNRI/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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A team of scientists used a telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain to detect a gas giant orbiting a tiny red star some 30 light-years from Earth. Baback Tafreshi/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Baback Tafreshi/Science Source/Getty Images

A Peculiar Solar System Has Scientists Rethinking Theories Of How Planets Form

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An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

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Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

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(Left to right) Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org hide caption

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Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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The sounds of pleasant, relaxed bird chatter made eastern grey squirrels resume foraging more quickly after hearing the sounds of a predator, researchers found. Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images

The Other Twitterverse: Squirrels Eavesdrop On Birds, Researchers Say

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