Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

Story Archive

An illustration of the DART spacecraft approaching two asteroids; it will crash into the smaller one to try to change how this space rock orbits its larger companion. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben

In a first test of its planetary defense efforts, NASA's going to shove an asteroid

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This illustration shows NASA's DART spacecraft and the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) LICIACube prior to impact at the Didymos binary system. NASA/Johns Hopkins, APL/Steve Gribben hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins, APL/Steve Gribben

A Mission To Redirect An Asteroid

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Technicians work on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which will launch in December. Astronomers say the next big telescope should be designed to search signs of life on planets that orbit distant stars. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Scientists investigate a humpback whale by boat and by drone in the surface waters near the west Antarctic Peninsula. Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab under NOAA permit 14809-03 and ACA permits 2015-011 and 2020-016 hide caption

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Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab under NOAA permit 14809-03 and ACA permits 2015-011 and 2020-016

The biggest whales can eat the equivalent of 80,000 Big Macs in one day

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A golden record is attached to a Voyager space probe launched in 1977. It contains a selection of recordings of life and culture on Earth and was place on their in case the probe went beyond the solar system, which it has. Space Frontiers/Getty Images hide caption

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Space Frontiers/Getty Images

Planning for a space mission to last more than 50 years

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The Voyager spacecraft have ventured far outside our solar system. Now a team of scientists is hoping to take the next interstellar mission even farther. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

If NASA greenlights this interstellar mission, it could last 100 years

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One of the Twinkies Colin Purrington opened in 2020 - from a box stashed away in 2012 - had collapsed into a shriveled mass. Colin Purrington hide caption

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Colin Purrington

The mystery of the mummified Twinkie

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Space companies like Blue Origin are grabbing headlines with the promise of a new era of space tourism, mostly recently with the plan to send William Shatner to the edge of space. But unless you're lucky, space is still out of reach for most of the public. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

William Shatner is bound for space, but the rest of us will have to wait

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The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Benjamin List and David MacMillan, two scientists who pioneered an "elegant" new method of building molecules, known as asymmetric organocatalysis. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins is stepping down by the end of the year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

NASA's new telescope bears the name of James Webb (center), an influential figure who was appointed by President John F. Kennedy to lead the space agency during the '60s. But some astronomers say discrimination against gay and lesbian government employees during his tenure should preclude him from having a telescope named in his honor. PhotoQuest/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoQuest/Getty Images

Shadowed by controversy, NASA won't rename its new space telescope

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The James Webb space telescope is an infrared telescope that will observe the early universe, between one million and a few billion years in age. NASA hide caption

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NASA

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

In December, NASA is scheduled to launch the huge $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is sometimes billed as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. NPR correspondents Rhitu Chatterjee and Nell Greenfieldboyce talk about this powerful new instrument and why building it took two decades.

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

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An artist's conception of the James Webb Space Telescope after it has unfolded in space. NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez hide caption

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NASA GSFC/CIL/Adriana Manrique Gutierrez

NASA's Got A New, Big Telescope. It Could Find Hints Of Life On Far-Flung Planets

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Two views of the Eagle Nebula's "Pillars of Creation," both taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The left shows the pillars in visible light; the right image was taken in infrared light. NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team hide caption

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NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team

NASA Is Launching A New Telescope That Could Offer Some Cosmic Eye Candy

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