Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Story Archive

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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Scientists put several litters of wolf puppies through a standard battery of tests. Many pups, such as this one named Flea, wouldn't fetch a ball. But then something surprising happened. Christina Hansen Wheat hide caption

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Christina Hansen Wheat

Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball

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Recent research has explored "helping" behavior in species ranging from nonhuman primates to rats and bats. To see whether intelligent birds might help out a feathered pal, scientists did an experiment using African grey parrots like these. Henry Lok/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Henry Lok/EyeEm/Getty Images

Polly Share A Cracker? Parrots Can Practice Acts Of Kindness, Study Finds

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Scientists are studying how some knots perform better than others, like this figure-eight knot tied using a special fiber that changes color under strain. Regions of high strain (green, yellow) can be easily distinguished from sections of the knot at low strain (red, orange). Joseph Sandt hide caption

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Joseph Sandt

A Knotty Problem Solved

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Members of the press cover the launch of the solar-powered rover Chandrayaan-2 in September. The goal was a moon landing, but the craft crashed. Another attempt to send a rover to the moon is underway. Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images

A horn player (left) in this detail from a 1694 altar carving by Francesco Antonio d'Alberto in Piedmont, Italy, clearly has a swollen neck that signifies goiter, medical historians say. The thyroid condition was a sign of poverty in those days. Renzo Dionigi hide caption

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Renzo Dionigi

Why Certain Poor Shepherds In Nativity Scenes Have Huge, Misshapen Throats

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Steamboat Geyser at Yellowstone National Park erupts on Sept. 17, 2018. Jacob W. Frank/NPS hide caption

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Jacob W. Frank/NPS

Steam On, Steamboat: The World's Tallest Active Geyser Has Another Record Year

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The sun, illustration. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Probe Gets Close To The Sun — Finds Rogue Plasma Waves And Flipping Magnetic Fields

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The Cambria factory in Minnesota manufactures slabs of engineered quartz for kitchen and bathroom countertops. If businesses don't follow worker protection rules, cutting these slabs to fit customers' kitchens can release lung-damaging silica dust. Cambria hide caption

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Cambria

'There's No Good Dust': What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

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What Happens After Quartz Countertops Leave The Factory

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Samples of Silestone, a countertop material made of quartz. Cutting the material releases dangerous silica dust that can damage people's lungs if the exposure to the dust is not properly controlled. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

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Common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus), such as this group day-roosting in a cave in Mexico, can form cooperative, friendship-like social relationships. B.G. Thomson/Science Source hide caption

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B.G. Thomson/Science Source

For These Vampires, A Shared Blood Meal Lets 'Friendship' Take Flight

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