Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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(Left to right) Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org hide caption

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Steven Mlodinow/EOL.org; Greg Lasley/EOL.org; dfwuw/EOL.org

North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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The sounds of pleasant, relaxed bird chatter made eastern grey squirrels resume foraging more quickly after hearing the sounds of a predator, researchers found. Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images

The Other Twitterverse: Squirrels Eavesdrop On Birds, Researchers Say

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All the portraits hanging on the wall inside the Louis Bornstein Family Amphitheater at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston on June 12, 2018 were of men, nearly all white. The portraits have since been removed. Pat Greenhouse/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Pat Greenhouse/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Academic Science Rethinks All-Too-White 'Dude Walls' Of Honor

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A goldenrod midge maggot begins to form a loop. Reproduced/adapted with permission of Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley, G. M., Wise, M. J., Harrison, J. S., Sutton, G. P., Kuo, C. and Patek, S. N., 2019, Journal of Experimental Biology, volume 222, doi:10.1242/jeb.201129 hide caption

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Reproduced/adapted with permission of Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley, G. M., Wise, M. J., Harrison, J. S., Sutton, G. P., Kuo, C. and Patek, S. N., 2019, Journal of Experimental Biology, volume 222, doi:10.1242/jeb.201129

Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap

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In the U.S., firearms kill more people through suicide than homicide. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How The CDC's Reluctance To Use The 'F-Word' — Firearms — Hinders Suicide Prevention

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Actual scientific research on beards is, regrettably, scant. However, researchers now know how beards are perceived by one important group of people: children. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Kids See Bearded Men As Strong — But Unattractive, Study Finds

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Sharks Like To Hang Out, But Their Spots Often Overlap With Commercial Fishers'

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Indian fishermen pull up a shark from a boat for sale at a harbor in Chennai in June 2018. Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images

A Study Confirms That Laugh Tracks Make Jokes Seem Funnier

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NASA Moves Forward With Plans For Multi-Billion-Dollar Moon Rocket

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Buzz Aldrin (left) practices collecting a sample while Neil Armstrong photographs during a training session before the Apollo 11 mission. The Apollo 11 astronauts returned with about 50 pounds of material, including 50 rocks. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Moon Rocks Still Awe, And Scientists Hope To Get Their Hands On More

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The International Space Station is reflected in the visor of Expedition 59 flight engineer David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency. NASA hide caption

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NASA

As NASA Aims For The Moon, An Aging Space Station Faces An Uncertain Future

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