Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Researchers uncover why shaving can cause sharp blades to dull quickly. Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images

Cutting-Edge Research Shows How Hair Dulls Razor Blades

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The SpaceX capsule sits aboard a recovery ship in the Gulf of Mexico. NASA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA/Screenshot by NPR

Splashdown! SpaceX And NASA Astronauts Make History

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There is a seemingly never-ending variety of beetles, about 400,000 known species! imv/Getty Images hide caption

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imv/Getty Images

Beetles And Wasps Vie For Title of Most Diverse Critter

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NASA astronauts (from left) Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy are the U.S. members of the Expedition 63 crew aboard the International Space Station. Behnken and Hurley are scheduled to return to Earth on Aug. 2. NASA hide caption

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NASA

On the left is an unmodified hatchling of a longfin inshore squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). The one on the right was injected with CRISPR-Cas9 targeting a pigmentation gene before the first cell division. It has very few pigmented cells and lighter eyes. Karen Crawford hide caption

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Karen Crawford

The 1st Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

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With her blood meal visible through her transparent abdomen, the female Aedes aegypti mosquito takes flight as she leaves her host's skin surface. James Gathany/CDC Public Health Image Library hide caption

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James Gathany/CDC Public Health Image Library

Why One Dangerous Mosquito Developed A Taste For Human Blood

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Faced with a rat trapped in a restrainer, a free rat opens the trap's door to liberate the trapped animal (while stepping on its head — "very rat-ish behavior," says University of Chicago neurobiologist Peggy Mason). David Christopher/University of Chicago hide caption

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David Christopher/University of Chicago

To Come To The Rescue Or Not? Rats, Like People, Take Cues From Bystanders

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The snake Chrysopelea paradisi is seen in Malaysia's Taman Negara National Park. To get from tree to tree, they can propel themselves in the air. David Renoult/iNaturalist hide caption

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David Renoult/iNaturalist

How Snakes Fly (Hint: It's Not On A Plane)

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New research shows that dolphins can learn foraging behavior from other dolphins. Sonja Wild/Dolphin Innovation Project hide caption

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Sonja Wild/Dolphin Innovation Project

Dolphins Learn Foraging Tricks From Each Other, Not Just From Mom

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An artist's interpretation of a baby mosasaur hatching from an egg in the Antarctic sea. Francisco Hueichaleo hide caption

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Francisco Hueichaleo

Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

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Sea otters are tourist magnets--and voracious eaters. Not everyone is happy about their comeback off the coast of British Columbia. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

What Happens When Sea Otters Eat 15 Pounds of Shellfish A Day

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Astronauts Set To Land At International Space Station After Historic Launch

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The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft is prepared for its first crewed launch from American soil. It arrived at the launch site on Feb. 13. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

New Spaceship Prepares To Blast Off And Make History

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Glacier mice in Iceland. Ruth Mottram hide caption

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Ruth Mottram

Herd Of Fuzzy Green 'Glacier Mice' Baffles Scientists

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