Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

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Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

Story Archive

As the first James Webb Space Telescope images appeared in New York's Times Square and everywhere else, scientists got to work diving deep into the data. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

The James Webb Space Telescope images have been a game changer for astronomers

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Why this key chance to getting permanent birth control is often missed

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The new bacteria, named Thiomargarita magnifica, were discovered on sunken leaves in a Caribbean mangrove swamp. The bacteria, shown here next to a dime, are close to the size of human eyelashes. Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL hide caption

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Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL

A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek

The new bacteria, named Thiomargarita magnifica, were discovered on sunken leaves in a Caribbean mangrove swamp. Olivier Gros/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL hide caption

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Olivier Gros/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL

Think all bacteria are microscopic? Tell that to these centimeter-long monsters

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A female bear and two 1-year-old cubs walk over snow-covered freshwater glacier ice in Southeast Greenland. Kristin Laidre hide caption

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Kristin Laidre

In a place with little sea ice, polar bears have found another way to hunt

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A makeshift memorial at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas after a school massacre left 19 children and two teachers dead. Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrators attend a candlelight vigil Wednesday in Fairfax, Va., for the victims of the Uvalde and Buffalo mass shootings. Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect hide caption

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Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect

Research shows policies that may help prevent mass shootings — and some that don't

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The black hole in the center of the Milky Way galaxy is captured in an image

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The 1st image of the supermassive black hole at our galactic center

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CDC says firearm-related homicides skyrocketed amid stresses of the pandemic

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More than 19,000 homicides in 2020 involved a firearm — an increase of nearly 5,000 from 2019. Mongkol Nitirojsakul/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mongkol Nitirojsakul/EyeEm/Getty Images

Firearm-related homicide rate skyrockets amid stresses of the pandemic, the CDC says

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NASA's Perseverance rover took this "selfie" next to a rock where it drilled for samples. NASA wants to bring samples collected by this rover back to Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA is bringing rocks back from Mars, but what if those samples contain alien life?

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