Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Story Archive

An image of Venus taken by NASA's Mariner 10 spacecraft as it sped past the planet in February 1974. NASA has decided to send two new probes to explore Venus. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA Picks Twin Missions To Visit Venus, Earth's 'Evil Twin'

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A jumping spider - Evarcha arcuata - literally hangs out at nighttime - but this was a surprise, even to a jumping spider researcher. Lukas Jonaitis/Getty Images/500px hide caption

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Lukas Jonaitis/Getty Images/500px

Why Jumping Spiders Spend All Night Hanging Out — Literally

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Scientists believe some heavy elements like iron are forged when a massive star explodes as a supernova. Plutonium's exact origins remain a mystery, but scientists think it was made by more than an ordinary supernova. Here, Cassiopeia A, a supernova remnant, was captured in a NASA image. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Curious Stardust At The Ocean Floor

Researchers report in the journal Science that they appear to have some clues about the origin of Earth's plutonium - which has been long debated. Correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce explains that traces of rare forms of iron and plutonium have been found in extraterrestrial debris that had sunk to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, hauled up by an oil company, then donated for research. By comparing the iron and the plutonium, scientists found the plutonium was likely forged in a cosmic cataclysm, perhaps a rare kind of supernova, and then rained down on Earth.

The Curious Stardust At The Ocean Floor

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Josh Pulliam and other researchers from Jake Socha's lab at Virginia Tech drove from Blacksburg, Va., to the northern part of the state and spent days collecting and studying Brood X cicadas. Jake Socha hide caption

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Jake Socha

Brood X Cicadas Are Busy And So Are The Scientists Who Study Them

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Scientists believe some heavy elements are forged when a massive star goes through its death throes and explodes as a supernova. Here, Kepler's supernova remnant was captured in a NASA image. NASA/ESA/Johns Hopkins University/NASA hide caption

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NASA/ESA/Johns Hopkins University/NASA

Freshly Made Plutonium From Outer Space Found On Ocean Floor

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Ash the cat selects the Kanizsa square stimulus — in other words, the illusion of a square — in a new study in which pet owners provided the data. Tara McCready hide caption

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Tara McCready

Cats Take 'If I Fits I Sits' Seriously, Even If The Space Is Just An Illusion

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The newly sequenced Canada lynx genome has already offered hints of how the North American wildcat might adapt — or not — to climate change, researchers say. Keith Williams/Flickr hide caption

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Keith Williams/Flickr

25 Down And 71,632 To Go: Scientists Seek Genomes Of All Critters With A Backbone

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William Beal, standing at center, started a long-term study on seed germination in 1879. He buried 20 bottles with seeds in them for later researchers to unearth and plant. Michigan State Unviersity hide caption

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Michigan State Unviersity

Researchers search for a bottle filled with seeds that was buried 142 years ago as part of a seed germination study. Derrick L. Turner/Michigan State University hide caption

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Derrick L. Turner/Michigan State University

The Secret Mission To Unearth Part Of A 142-Year-Old Experiment

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An algorithm was able to very reliably detect which chirps came from which individual naked mole-rat. So each naked mole-rat has its own distinctive voice. Felix Petermann/MDC hide caption

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Felix Petermann/MDC

What's In A Squeak? For Naked Mole Rats ... EVERYTHING

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Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

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Spotted Trunkfish collected in the US Virgin Islands in 1871. Melissa Aja/Museum of Comparative Zoology/President and Fellows of Harvard College hide caption

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Melissa Aja/Museum of Comparative Zoology/President and Fellows of Harvard College

Scientific Specimens Are Going Online, But Much Remains Hidden In Storage

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An octopus in active sleep — possibly dreaming. Sylvia Medeiros hide caption

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Sylvia Medeiros

Sleeping Octopuses May Have Dreams, But They're Probably Brief

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Glacier mice in Iceland. Ruth Mottram/Ruth Mottram hide caption

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Ruth Mottram/Ruth Mottram

Meet The 'Glacier Mice'

(Encore episode.) In 2006, while hiking around the Root Glacier in Alaska, glaciologist Tim Bartholomaus encountered something strange and unexpected on the ice — dozens of fuzzy, green moss balls. It turns out, other glaciologists had come across glacial moss balls before and lovingly called them "glacier mice."

Meet The 'Glacier Mice'

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