Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
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Nell Greenfieldboyce

Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

Story Archive

Two views of the Eagle Nebula's "Pillars of Creation," both taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The left shows the pillars in visible light; the right image was taken in infrared light. NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team hide caption

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NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team

NASA Is Launching A New Telescope That Could Offer Some Cosmic Eye Candy

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A new study examines whether or not dogs are able to understand the difference between a human's mistake versus active intent to withhold a treat. Os Tartarouchos/Getty Images hide caption

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Os Tartarouchos/Getty Images

Your Dog May Know If You've Done Something On Purpose, Or Just Screwed Up

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Adult sunflower sea stars feed on mussels at the Friday Harbor Laboratories. Shells from earlier meals collect at the bottom of the tank. The sea star on the bottom, called Charlotte, is the mother of the lab's 1-year-old juvenile stars. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

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Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Poodle "Lotti" from Austria takes a look in the mirror of a beauty case during a contest at the "World Dog Show" dog fair in Leipzig, eastern Germany, on November 8, 2017. AFP Contributor/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

Triantha occidentalis, with its dainty white flowers appears innocuous, but its sticky stem helps the plant trap and make a meal of tiny insects. Danilo Lima hide caption

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Danilo Lima

This Sweet White Flower Is Actually A Sneaky Carnivore, Scientists Discover

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Illustration of two black holes orbiting each other in a combined accretion disc. Eventually the black holes will merge, an event that will produce gravitational waves. MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Gravitational Waves: Unlocking The Secrets Of The Universe

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Sunflower sea stars — voracious predators that feed on mussels and sea urchins — are succumbing to a strange wasting disease that has devastated populations of sea stars along the West Coast. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

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Dennis Wise/University of Washington

To Save A Huge, 24-Armed Sea Creature, Scientists Become Loving Foster Parents

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Though they're called ice worms, the creatures Hotaling (right) and his colleagues study on the glaciers of Mount Rainier can't handle the slightest bit of freezing. If temperatures dip even slightly below zero degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit), Hotaling says, the worms die. Peter Wimberger hide caption

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Peter Wimberger

It's Summer, And That Means The Mysterious Return Of Glacier Ice Worms

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Biologist Peter Wimberger holding an ice worm in the snow. Nell Greenfieldboyce/NPR hide caption

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Nell Greenfieldboyce/NPR

An artistic image of what happens when a monstrous black hole collides with — and gulps down — a neutron star the size of a large city. Carl Knox/OzGrav/Swinburne hide caption

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Carl Knox/OzGrav/Swinburne

When A City-Size Star Becomes A Black Hole's Lunch, The Universe Roils

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An illustrated view of the Earth moving around our sun, and the stars that have the right vantage point to view that transit — if anyone's out there looking. OpenSpace/American Museum of Natural History hide caption

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OpenSpace/American Museum of Natural History

Alien Planet-Hunters In Hundreds Of Nearby Star Systems Could Spot Earth

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An image of Venus taken by NASA's Mariner 10 spacecraft as it sped past the planet in February 1974. NASA has decided to send two new probes to explore Venus. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA Picks Twin Missions To Visit Venus, Earth's 'Evil Twin'

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A jumping spider - Evarcha arcuata - literally hangs out at nighttime - but this was a surprise, even to a jumping spider researcher. Lukas Jonaitis/Getty Images/500px hide caption

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Lukas Jonaitis/Getty Images/500px

Why Jumping Spiders Spend All Night Hanging Out — Literally

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