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Police officers carry a detained opposition activist during a banned anti-Kremlin protest in Moscow on May 31. Opposition leaders say the new law, championed by the majority United Russia party led by Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, could be used to pressure activists into not organizing such protests. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

New Law Would Restore KGB-Era Powers In Russia

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U.S.-Russia Carry Out Largest Spy Swap In Decades

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Former Yukos CEO Mikhail Khodorkovsky (center) speaks to his lawyer from behind a glass wall in court. Khodorkovsky, once Russia's richest man, was sentenced in 2005 to nine years in prison. Now, he faces new charges. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

An ethnic Uzbek mother and son wait at the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border outside the village of Suratash, Kyrgyzstan, on June 14. Uzbek and Kyrgyz alike are trying to make sense of ethnic violence that took place last month. Oxana Onipko/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oxana Onipko/AFP/Getty Images

This undated image from the Russian social networking website Odnoklassniki, or Classmates, shows a woman whom journalists have identified as Anna Chapman. Besides being accused of espionage, Chapman has become an Internet sensation. AP hide caption

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AP

Kyrgyz Vote On Constitution May Be Delayed

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Ethnic Uzbek women from Kyrgyzstan plead for help at a refugee camp in Nariman on the border with Uzbekistan. Tens of thousands of minority Uzbeks have fled their homes in the wake of ethnic violence last week in southern Kyrgyzstan. Oxana Onipko/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oxana Onipko/AFP/Getty Images

Calm Returns, Fear Remains, In Kyrgyzstan's South

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