Frank Langfitt Frank Langfitt is NPR's London correspondent. He covers the UK and Ireland, as well as stories elsewhere in Europe.

Charles and his bride Xiao Fang met through a social media app where they connected by shaking their smartphones at the same time. NPR's Frank Langfitt met Charles in Shanghai and drove him 500 miles to his family's home in central China for the wedding. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Modern Love in China: Shaking Your Smartphone To Find Your Soul Mate

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2 Brothers In Rural China Beat The Odds; Practice Law In Shanghai

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500 Mile Free Ride Beats Crowded Train Over China's New Year

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New Chinese Social Media Policy May Be Used To Target Political Speech

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The number of children who need glasses has risen quickly across East Asia and Southeast Asia. But some parents and doctors in China are skeptical of lenses. They think glasses weaken children's vision. Imaginechina/Corbis hide caption

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Imaginechina/Corbis

Why Is Nearsightedness Skyrocketing Among Chinese Youth?

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Some DVD vendors in Shanghai still sell on the street, but a government crackdown forced most out of business or into storefronts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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The Oscar Nominees Are In; The Shanghai DVD Sellers Are Stocking Up

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Some fake Apple stores like this one in Kunming, in China's southwestern Yunnan province, were so authentic-looking that even some of their employees didn't know they were fake. Stephen Shaver/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Stephen Shaver/UPI/Landov

China Continues To Push The (Fake) Envelope

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On Jan. 1, people gathered at a makeshift memorial marking the site of a New Year's Eve stampede on the Bund in Shanghai, China. Three dozen people died, and dozens more were injured. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Shanghai Officials Fired Over Stampede That Killed 36

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Zanta now lives on the outskirts of Beijing. Courtesy of Jocelyn Ford hide caption

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Courtesy of Jocelyn Ford

American Film On A Tibetan Migrant Finds Unlikely Success — In China

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Buddhists pour fish into the river in Shanghai. Environmentalists say the ritual, while well-intentioned, can introduce invasive species. Many of the fish are quickly swooped up in nets by fishermen who position themselves nearby. Julia Langfitt for NPR hide caption

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Julia Langfitt for NPR

Along Shanghai's River, Buddhist Tradition Meets Greedy Fishermen

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China's President Xi Jinping, shown speaking in Bruges, Belgium, back in April, has made fighting corruption one of his top priorities. Many Chinese bureaucrats are angry, saying a loss of bribes has greatly reduced their incomes. Yves Logghe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yves Logghe/AFP/Getty Images

China's Fierce Anti-Corruption Crackdown: An Insider's View

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NPR reporter Frank Langfitt and one of his "customers," a biotech worker, whom he drove to a self-help conference in Shanghai's sprawling Pudong District. NPR hide caption

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Reporter Offers Free Cab Rides For Stories From 'Streets Of Shanghai'

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Hong Kong Demonstrators Hope End Of Protests Not An End To The Fight

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