Acacia Squires
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Acacia Squires

Acacia Squires

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Tuesday

Frederic Reglain/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images; CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images; Drew Allyn; Gladys Knight

Danyel Smith gives Black women in pop their flowers in 'Shine Bright'

In this conversation from April 2022, former guest host Juana Summers sits down with author Danyel Smith to chat about her book, Shine Bright: A Very Personal History of Black Women in Pop. They talk all about Black women in music — like Gladys Knight, Mahalia Jackson and Whitney Houston — whose true genius and contributions have not yet been fully recognized.

Danyel Smith gives Black women in pop their flowers in 'Shine Bright'

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Tuesday

Thursday

Abortion rights supporters gather outside the Michigan Capitol in Lansing, Mich., during a rally on September 7, 2022. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

Tuesday

Former U.S. Rep. Joe Cunningham arrives at a debate for Democrats seeking their party's nomination in South Carolina's governor's race on Friday, June 10, 2022, in Columbia, S.C. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

Tuesday

Danyel Smith, author of Shine Bright: A Very Personal History of Black Women in Pop. Drew Allyn/Drew Allyn hide caption

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Drew Allyn/Drew Allyn

Danyel Smith highlights Black female artists who defined pop music in 'Shine Bright'

Guest host Juana Summers talks with Danyel Smith about her new memoir, Shine Bright: A Personal History of Black Women in Pop. As a previous editor-in-chief for both Billboard and Vibe magazines, host of the Black Girl Songbook podcast, and longtime music reporter, Danyel uses her expertise to spotlight the stories of pop powerhouses like Gladys Knight, Mahalia Jackson, Whitney Houston, and more. Danyel crafts a love letter to Black women in pop, capturing the intimate details of who they were, their influence on her, and how their music changed pop forever.

Danyel Smith highlights Black female artists who defined pop music in 'Shine Bright'

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Friday

This Jan. 6, 2015, file photo shows an Etsy mobile credit card reader, in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Friday

Simone Ashley as Kate Sharma and Jonathan Bailey as Anthony Bridgerton in season two of Bridgerton. Liam Daniel/Netflix hide caption

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Liam Daniel/Netflix

Tuesday

Tuesday

Colorado state Rep. Julie McCluskie, a Democrat, is surrounded by protective plastic barriers in the House chambers at the Colorado State Capitol during an emergency legislative session on November 30. Lawmakers there are planning to move their 2021 session back by at least a month. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

Monday

Nicole Galloway, Missouri's state auditor and Democratic candidate for governor, is challenging Republican Gov. Mike Parson, primarily on his coronavirus record. Here, Galloway addresses the media last month, while Kansas City, Mo., Mayor Quinton Lucas looks on during a news conference. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Saturday

State representatives stand during the Pledge of Allegiance in the Iowa House chambers in Des Moines, Iowa, in June. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Are You Watching Your State Lawmaker Elections? Here's Why You Should

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Wednesday

A supporter of ride-hail drivers holds a sign during a protest in front of Uber headquarters on May 8 in San Francisco. A new law in California aims to change how gig economy and other contract workers are classified. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images