Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.
Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Reporter, Business, New York

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Rep. Maxine Waters, seated next to Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Texas, at a hearing in July, is set to become chair of the House Financial Services Committee. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

'Auntie Maxine' Waters Gets Ready To Take On The Banks As House Panel Chair

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/667546032/668135838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Some Congressional Districts, The Tax Cut is Actually Hurting Republican Campaigns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/663655601/663655602" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese Yuan Continues To Tumble In Value Against U.S. Dollar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662696769/662696770" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Economy Continues To Grow At Strong Pace, But There Are Signs Of Potential Trouble

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/661136962/661136963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Trump Administration's Tariffs On China Are Not Having The Desired Effect So Far

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657023579/657023580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stocks Plunge On Worries Over Trade, Rising Interest Rates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656455233/656455234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Why People Take A Gamble On Mother Nature With Catastrophe Bonds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656292527/656292528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump, accompanied by Donald Trump Jr. (from left), Ivanka Trump and Eric Trump at an event in 2016. New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood says the younger Trumps had exercised no real control over the Trump Foundation's activities, despite being nominal board members. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Tax Authorities Were Either Unwilling To Take On The Trumps Or Lacked The Resources

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/654123982/654124027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

General Electric Stuns Wall Street By Firing CEO John Flannery After A Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653430412/653430440" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Flannery is being replaced as head of General Electric. GE's status fell sharply over the past decade. The company has resorted to selling off divisions and laying off employees, a process that accelerated under Flannery. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Drew/AP

Trump Says China Is Intentionally Attacking His Supporters With Its Retaliatory Tariffs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/649274489/649274490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript