Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
Jim Zarroli 2010
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Jim Zarroli

Buffett Remains Optimistic About The Economy

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Wall Street Bonuses Fell From 2009 Level

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Oil Prices Reflect Fears Unrest Will Spread

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National AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka speaks to protesters in Wisconsin's Capitol rotunda Friday during a rally opposing Gov. Scott Walker's bill threatening collective bargaining rights. Mark Hirsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Hirsch/Getty Images

Boards Approve NYSE-Deutsche Boerse Merger

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Traders work at the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday as a merger with the German exchange, Deutsche Boerse, moved forward. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

NYSE Finds Romance In Germany; Will It Work?

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NYSE, Deutsche Boerse In Talks To Merge

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Frank Russo, a retired resident of Nassau County, pays nearly $16,000 in property taxes a year. Local government officials say the high taxes are driving people out of the county. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Nassau County: Jazz Age Enclave Hits The Fiscal Skids

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Steve Jobs Goes On Medical Leave

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Verizon's iPhone Deal Ups Smart Phone Competition

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Jobs Report Shows People Leaving Work Force

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