Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

Maggie Barcellano prepares dinner in January 2014 at her father's house in Austin, Texas. Barcellano, who lives with her father, enrolled in the food stamps program while she works as a home health aide and raises her 3-year-old daughter. A study suggests that social safety nets, including food stamps, helped cushion income losses for middle- and working-class Americans during the recession. Tamir Kalifa/AP hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa/AP

Study Suggests Recession, Recovery Have Not Left The Rich Richer

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A an employee works at Amazon's fulfillment center in Rugeley, central England, in 2012. President Obama wants Amazon and other U.S. companies to bring more of their overseas earnings home. Phil Noble/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Obama's Plan To Tax Overseas Earnings Draws Scrutiny

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Document Leak Reveals Secret Swiss Bank Accounts

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Leaked HSBC Documents Shed Light On Swiss Banking Industry

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Standard & Poor's To Pay Over $1 Billion In Legal Settlement

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Fieldale Farms in Gainesville, Ga., says it can't keep enough workers to meet demand for its poultry products, despite paying $16 per hour plus benefits. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Some Businesses Say Immigrant Workers Are Harder To Find

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Auto dealers are extending loans to a growing number of people with weak credit. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Auto Loan Surge Fuels Fears Of Another Subprime Crisis

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Standard & Poor's Settles In SEC Ratings Fraud Case

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Euro Falls To 9-Year Low Against U.S. Dollar

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To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

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President Vladimir Putin speaks in Moscow on Dec. 23. Russia's current economic crisis stems from Western sanctions and diving oil prices. Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images

Sanctions Intensify Russia's Free Fall Into Economic Crisis

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President Obama announces changes to U.S. policy on Cuba, including relaxing restrictions on U.S. banking in the country, in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov

Opportunity, Caution Seen For U.S. Banks As Cuba Rules Ease

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An "Assembled in the USA" stamp is seen at the side of a box containing a 32-inch television set May 29 in the warehouse of Element Electronics, in Winnsboro, S.C. For the phenomenon of "reshoring," or bringing overseas jobs back to the United States, the electronics sector has been a leader. Chris Keane/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Chris Keane/Reuters/Landov

'Reshoring' Trend Has Little Impact On U.S. Economy, Study Finds

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Aerospace giant Lockheed Martin is being sued for choosing retirement funds that shortchanged its employees and charged high fees. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Lockheed Martin Case Puts 401(k) Plans On Trial

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