Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
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Jim Zarroli

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Thursday

Audience members listen to public comment at a special session of the Oakland City Council about a resolution calling for an immediate cease-fire in Gaza on Nov. 27, 2023, in Oakland, Calif. D. Ross Cameron/AP hide caption

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D. Ross Cameron/AP

Gaza cease-fire resolutions roil U.S. local communities

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Tuesday

Festival in the Catskills celebrates resort area once known as the Borscht Belt

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Tuesday

Concerns are raised about whether cannabis is safe for older users

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Wednesday

The auction featured a number of items from the office where Joan Didion worked, including two electric typewriters that sold for $5,500 and $6,000, respectively. Jim Zarroli/For NPR hide caption

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Jim Zarroli/For NPR

Writer Joan Didion's possessions sell for eye-popping prices at auction

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Wednesday

Author Salman Rushdie poses for photographers at a signing for his book Home, in London on June 6, 2017. Grant Pollard/Invision/AP hide caption

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Grant Pollard/Invision/AP

Exiled writers reflect on freedom of speech in America in light of Rushdie attack

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Tuesday

Attempts to ban books in school districts around the country have increased in recent years. Now, some states are working on enacting laws to give politicians more power over public libraries. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Some states are changing the laws that govern community libraries

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Tuesday

A visitor reads a book at a book fair during a Publishers Forum in Lviv, Ukraine, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. A regional council in western Ukraine had passed a motion to ban all Russian-language books, films and songs in the region. Mykola Tys/AP hide caption

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Mykola Tys/AP

Russian invasion upends young, flourishing Ukrainian publishing industry

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Monday

Sunday

People are buying a lot more books these days, in part because the pandemic has trapped everyone indoors with little to do. But among younger readers, another factor is driving sales up: The social-media site TikTok, where users post short videos they create themselves. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

TikTok is driving book sales. Here are some titles #BookTok recommends

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Wednesday

Wednesday

Bernie Madoff, Whose Ponzi Scheme Bilked Thousands, Dies In Prison

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Friday

Extended Paycheck Protection Program May Not Be Enough To Help Small Businesses

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Thursday

Saturday

Pandemic Relief Will Run Out If President Doesn't Sign Package Into Law

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Tuesday

Congress Passes $900 Billion COVID-19 Relief Bill. Is It Enough?

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Monday

How A New Coronavirus Relief Bill Will Help Americans In The Pandemic

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Wednesday

Local Governments Across America Say They're Desperate For Federal Help

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A toy reindeer is shown on a white background. Radio stations, looking to boost ratings and provide comfort in a pandemic-marred year, started playing songs as early as July. And listeners loved it. mattjeacock/Getty Images hide caption

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mattjeacock/Getty Images

In Pandemic, The Most Wonderful Time For Christmas Songs Turned Out To Be ... In July

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Thursday

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos is the world's wealthiest person, according to the latest Bloomberg Billionaires Index, with a net worth of $182 billion. Four others also have fortunes over $100 billion. Here, Bezos speaks at a conference in 2018. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

There's Rich, And Then There's Jeff Bezos Rich: Meet The World's Centibillionaires

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Wednesday

Soaring Stock Market Creates A Club Of Centibillionaires

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Investors Can Now Bet On The Future Of Water Prices In California

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Tuesday

The Robinhood investment app appears on a smartphone in this photo illustration. Day trading has surged during the coronavirus pandemic as stay-at-home people try buying and selling stocks, often for the first time. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

He Thought Day Trading Would Be A Thrill. He Ended Up Losing $127,000

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Monday

Former Day Trader Warns Others Of The Risk Of Addiction

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Tuesday

According to Nasdaq, three-quarters of listed companies would not currently meet the proposed diversity standards. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Nasdaq Takes Aim At All-White, Male Company Boards With Diversity Proposal

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