Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
Jim Zarroli 2010
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Jim Zarroli

Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Correspondent, Business Desk, New York

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Story Archive

The Dow Surpasses 30,000 For 1st Time Ever

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The Charging Bull statue is shown in New York's financial district. The Dow surpassed 30,000 points for the first time after President Trump allowed the transition process to begin. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Fed, Treasury Department Split On When To Cut Off Pandemic Loan Programs

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, left, and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin bump elbows after concluding their testimony before Congress on June 30. The Fed and Treasury engaged in a rare clash over the fate of key pandemic lending programs. Tasos Katopodis/AP hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/AP

Chinese President Xi Jinping and then Vice President Joe Biden attend an arrival ceremony in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., in 2015. Biden is under pressure from both the left and the right to continue taking a hard line on trade with China. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump Launched A Trade War Against China. Don't Look To Biden To Reverse It

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Senate Fails To Approve Judy Shelton's Nomination To Federal Reserve Board

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Stocks Skyrocket Amid Pfizer's Report On Effectiveness Of A Coronavirus Vaccine

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The exterior of the New York Stock Exchange last week. Stocks surged after Pfizer said its experimental COVID-19 vaccine was more than 90% effective and after former Vice President Joe Biden was elected president. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Stocks Soar To Record Highs On Vaccine Hopes

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How The Election Might Affect Stock Prices

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A store displays a sign before closing down permanently following the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, on Aug. 4, 2020 in Arlington, Va. The Small Business Administration's inspector general office said billions of dollars in relief loans may have been handed out to fraudsters or ineligible applicants. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images