Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
Jim Zarroli 2010
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Jim Zarroli

Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Correspondent, Business Desk, New York

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Story Archive

Extended Paycheck Protection Program May Not Be Enough To Help Small Businesses

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Pandemic Relief Will Run Out If President Doesn't Sign Package Into Law

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Congress Passes $900 Billion COVID-19 Relief Bill. Is It Enough?

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How A New Coronavirus Relief Bill Will Help Americans In The Pandemic

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Local Governments Across America Say They're Desperate For Federal Help

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A toy reindeer is shown on a white background. Radio stations, looking to boost ratings and provide comfort in a pandemic-marred year, started playing songs as early as July. And listeners loved it. mattjeacock/Getty Images hide caption

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In Pandemic, The Most Wonderful Time For Christmas Songs Turned Out To Be ... In July

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Amazon founder Jeff Bezos is the world's wealthiest person, according to the latest Bloomberg Billionaires Index, with a net worth of $182 billion. Four others also have fortunes over $100 billion. Here, Bezos speaks at a conference in 2018. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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There's Rich, And Then There's Jeff Bezos Rich: Meet The World's Centibillionaires

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Soaring Stock Market Creates A Club Of Centibillionaires

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Investors Can Now Bet On The Future Of Water Prices In California

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The Robinhood investment app appears on a smartphone in this photo illustration. Day trading has surged during the coronavirus pandemic as stay-at-home people try buying and selling stocks, often for the first time. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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He Thought Day Trading Would Be A Thrill. He Ended Up Losing $127,000

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Former Day Trader Warns Others Of The Risk Of Addiction

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According to Nasdaq, three-quarters of listed companies would not currently meet the proposed diversity standards. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Nasdaq Takes Aim At All-White, Male Company Boards With Diversity Proposal

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The Dow Surpasses 30,000 For 1st Time Ever

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The Charging Bull statue is shown in New York's financial district. The Dow surpassed 30,000 points for the first time after President Trump allowed the transition process to begin. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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