Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
Jim Zarroli 2010
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Jim Zarroli

Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Correspondent, Business Desk, New York

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Story Archive

Stock trading has become easier and cheaper than ever. But have venues like Robinhood made it too risky for inexperienced investors? Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Turn To Stock Trading During Pandemic, But Some See Trouble For The Young

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President Trump's new executive order to prevent evictions isn't enough and Congress needs to act, housing activists say. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

'A Homeless Pandemic' Looms As 30 Million Are At Risk Of Eviction

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What To Expect From New Relief Bill As Unemployment Spikes And Aid Set To Expire?

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Signs are displayed outside the Washington, D.C., Department of Employment Services. New claims for unemployment benefits around the country rose for the first time in four months. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Job Picture Worsens: Millions More File For Unemployment, In Reversal

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A Tesla car is on display at a showroom in Beijing on May 10. Tesla's stock has soared from $430 a share at the start of 2020 to nearly $1,600 at Wednesday's close. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

More so than other big banks, Goldman Sachs depends on stock and bond trading to make money, and the financial markets were the place to be in the second quarter. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

It's Nice To Be Rich: Wall Street Is Raking In Profits In The Stock Market

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"We still face much uncertainty regarding the future path of the economy," JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said Tuesday in a statement accompanying the giant bank's financial results. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

'We Still Face Much Uncertainty': Pandemic Hammers Big Banks

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Masks are required for entry to a shoe store in Glendale, Calif. Most people follow guidelines to wear masks when they enter retail stores and restaurants, but some customers don't comply. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

The Customer Is Always Right. Except When They Won't Wear A Mask

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Gov. Jim Justice, W.Va., waves to the crowd at his annual State of the State speech on Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

Data Raises Questions About Who Benefited From PPP Loans

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How The Recession Has Benefited The Richest Of The Rich

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Matt Comstock (left) takes the temperature of a guest at Busch Gardens in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday. A spike in coronavirus cases in Florida and other states raised concerns in financial markets. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

Dow Dives 1,800 Points On Worries Of 2nd Coronavirus Wave

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Stocks fell sharply Thursday after coronavirus cases spike and the Federal Reserve warned that the recovery will take a long time. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Market Meltdown: Dow Dives 1,800 Points On Worries Of 2nd Coronavirus Wave

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell speaks during a news conference in Washington on March 3. Companies can borrow money from the Fed under its new lending programs, but the central bank's effort to help the economy has had lopsided results. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The Fed Helped Companies Borrow Money. Some Laid Off Thousands Anyway

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