Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
Jim Zarroli 2010
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Jim Zarroli

Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Correspondent, Business Desk, New York

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Story Archive

Special Coverage Of Impeachment Articles And Trade Deal

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Special Coverage: Speaker Pelosi Announces U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Deal

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The long economic recovery has brought unemployment to historic lows. But the number of men in the labor force during their prime working age has dropped significantly over the past 50 years. Jetta Productions Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Jetta Productions Inc./Getty Images

Despite Job Boom, More Men Are Giving Up On Work

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Hotel owner Gordon Sondland, who is scheduled to testify before Congress on Wednesday, is a pivotal witness in the impeachment inquiry. Carlos Jasso/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Jasso/Reuters

Gordon Sondland Was A Low-Profile Hotel Owner. Until He Went To Work For Trump

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Even as the popularity of e-cigarettes exploded — with unknown health risks — the federal government was slow to regulate vaping companies. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

How Vaping Snuck Up On Regulators

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Apple Pledges $2.5 Billion To Ease Shortage Of Affordable Housing In California

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President Jimmy Carter's younger brother, Billy, became the target of a Senate investigation over his ties to the Libyan government and appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee in August 1980. AP hide caption

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AP

Cashing In On The White House Connection: It's Not Just Hunter Biden

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Michael Stumo and his wife Nadia Milleron, whose daughter was killed in the Ethiopian Airlines Flight crash, attend a House committee hearing June 19. They and other victims' families have been a driving force in the campaign to keep the Boeing 737 Max grounded. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Crash Victim's Family Pushes To Keep Boeing 737 Max From Flying Again Too Soon

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U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He in the Oval Office at the White House October 11, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump announced a 'phase one' partial trade deal with China. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S., China Reach 'Phase 1' Of Trade Agreement

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As Pressure From Regulators Increases, Juul Shifts Its Strategy

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