Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.
Jim Zarroli 2010
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Jim Zarroli

Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Correspondent, Business Desk, New York

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Story Archive

In Real Estate, Tax Credits And Loopholes Are Common

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'New York Times' Reports Trump Paid Little In Federal Income Taxes

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The office of Capital Area Food Bank stands empty in Washington in March. Many companies across the country have adopted work-from-home policies, raising concerns among some employers that some of the office buzz is gone. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

JPMorgan Chase Recalls Some Employees Back To The Office

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Stocks Plunge As Investors Become Less Optimistic About Economic Recovery

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Bobby Parker, showing off his tattoo that reads "Only God Can Judge Me," says he had to sleep outside when he was locked out of his New Orleans home. Katy Reckdahl hide caption

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Katy Reckdahl

Thrown Out Of Home, At A Time When A Roof Is More Important Than Ever

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Citigroup appointed Jane Fraser as its next CEO, making her the first woman to lead a major U.S. bank. She will replace Michael Corbat, who will step down in February. Julian Restrepo/Citigroup via AP hide caption

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Julian Restrepo/Citigroup via AP

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks to reporters in March in Washington, D.C. In an interview Friday with NPR, Powell said it may take years before the economy has fully recovered. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Fed's Jerome Powell: Jobless Rate Better Than Expected; Recovery To Take A Long Time

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For election night 2016, Gretchen Sisson had a sheet cake made for her friends, expecting to celebrate the election of the first woman president of the United States. Things didn't turn out as she expected. Gretchen Sisson hide caption

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Gretchen Sisson

2020 Is The Year Of The Woman Donor: Campaign Contributions Surge

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Coronavirus Pandemic Hits New York City's Economy Hard

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The Google logo adorns the outside of the company's New York City office building. The stock market is hitting records, in large part because of a handful of superstar tech stocks, including Alphabet, Google's parent company. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

There's More Big Tech In Your Life Than You Even Know. Check Out Your Stock Portfolio

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Despite Investors Preaching Diversity, Market Keeps Relying On Big Tech Stocks

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