Asma Khalid Asma Khalid is a political reporter focusing on voters through the lens of demographics and economics.
Stephen Voss/NPR
Asma Khalid 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Asma Khalid

Political Reporter

Asma Khalid is a political reporter. She travels the country focusing on voters through the lens of demographics and economics.

Before joining NPR's political team, Asma helped launch a new team for Boston's NPR station WBUR where she reported on biz/tech and the Future of Work.

She's reported on a range of stories over the years — including the 2016 presidential campaign, the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but was introduced to radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

What Trump's Immigration Policies Mean For The Midterms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621726946/621726947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Trump Administration's Family Separation Border Policy Explained

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621165566/621167764" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dan Moore voted for President Trump and says he does not regret his vote even though his job may be in limbo because of the steel tariffs. Asma Khalid/ NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Asma Khalid/ NPR

Trump's Tariffs Worry A Small Steel City In Pennsylvania

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617200482/618163049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, June 7

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/618076791/618082921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Senatorial candidate, Don Blankenship, speaks during a town hall to kick off his GOP campaign in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18, 2018. After losing the Republican primary, Blankenship says he'll run under the Constitution Party banner. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Stacey Evans (left) and Stacey Abrams (right), the two candidates running for governor in the Georgia Democratic primary on May 22. They have plenty of similarities: they're both women named Stacey; they're both former legislators in the Georgia House of Representatives; they're both lawyers; and they're both calling for similar progressive policies, such as expanding Medicaid. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Asma Khalid/NPR

Georgia Governor's Race: Stacey Vs. Stacey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612583975/612583976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democrat Stacey Abrams greets voters at an early vote event in DeKalb County, Ga. Abrams is in a competitive Democratic primary with an opponent who shares the same first name, Stacey Evans. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Asma Khalid/NPR

50 States And No Black Governors, But That Could Change In 2018

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611783940/612159349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Black Gubernatorial Candidates Face An Uphill Battle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612082757/612082758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I put over 50,000 miles on my Jeep this race alone," said Richard Ojeda, a Democrat running for Congress in West Virginia's 3rd Congressional District. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Asma Khalid/NPR

'Tea Party Liberal' Promises To Bring A Blue Wave To West Virginia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602326027/605597056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hundreds of students gather at the State Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Friday to protest gun violence, part of a national high school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Mone/AP

A New Generation's Political Awakening

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604293152/604446531" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How Events Shape, Or Don't Shape, Political Worldviews

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604260279/604263904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript