Asma Khalid Asma Khalid is a White House correspondent for NPR. She also co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.
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Asma Khalid

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Asma Khalid 2016
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Asma Khalid

White House Correspondent

Asma Khalid is a White House correspondent for NPR. She also co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.

Khalid is a bit of a campaign-trail addict, having reported on the 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 elections.

She joined NPR's Washington team in 2016 to focus on the intersection of demographics and politics.

During the 2020 presidential campaign, she covered the crowded Democratic primary field, and then went on to report on Joe Biden's candidacy.

Her reporting often dives into the political, cultural and racial divides in the country.

Before joining NPR's political team, Khalid was a reporter for Boston's NPR station WBUR, where she was nearly immediately flung into one of the most challenging stories of her career — the Boston Marathon bombings. She had joined the network just a few weeks prior, but went on to report on the bombings, the victims, and the reverberations throughout the city. She also covered Boston's failed Olympic bid and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Later, she led a new business and technology team at the station that reported on the future of work.

In addition to countless counties across America, Khalid's reporting has taken her to Pakistan, the United Kingdom and China.

She got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but she fell in love with radio through an internship at the BBC Newshour in London during graduate school.

She's been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, CNN's Inside Politics and PBS's Washington Week.

Her reporting has been recognized with the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Gracie Award.

A native of Crown Point, Ind., Khalid is a graduate of Indiana University in Bloomington. She has also studied at the University of Cambridge, the London School of Economics, the American University in Beirut and Middlebury College's Arabic school.

Story Archive

Will Disaster Response In Puerto Rico Improve Under Biden?

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Rafael Eduardo an undocumented immigrant from Venezuela hugs another immigrant outside of the Saint Andrews Episcopal Church, on Marthas Vineyard on September 15th 2022. Dominic Chavez for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Dominic Chavez for The Washington Post via Getty Images

Then-candidate Joe Biden speaks at a community event while campaigning on December 13, 2019 in San Antonio, Texas. Daniel Carde/Getty Images hide caption

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It's General Election Season! Live From Texas

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Biden's pledge to unify the nation is falling flat, some voters say

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A torn US national flag is seen during Hurricane Sally landfall in Mobile, Alabama on September 16, 2020. CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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As Political Violence Rises, Biden To Host Unity Conference

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On the anniversary of JFK's 'man on the moon' speech, Biden touts 'cancer moonshot'

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US President Joe Biden speaks about the soul of the nation, outside of Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 1, 2022. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Republican candidate for US Senate Herschel Walker walks onstage during pre-race ceremonies prior to the NASCAR Cup Series Quaker State 400 at Atlanta Motor Speedway on July 10, 2022 in Hampton, Georgia. James Gilbert/Getty Images hide caption

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WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 03: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) receives the gavel from Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) during the first session of the 116th Congress at the U.S. Capitol January 03, 2019 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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How U.S. allies view the country a year after its withdrawal from Afghanistan

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A man shows a certificate of appreciation from an American defense contractor while seeking help with his Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) application at Herat Kabul Internet cafe on August 8, 2021 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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The Dire Reality In Afghanistan A Year After The U.S. Withdrawal

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Jill Mallen gets her groceries at a food pantry because of soaring inflation. She says she's a "confused" voter — a registered Democrat who feels Republicans did a better job of managing the economy. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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How inflation is influencing politics in a bellwether Florida county

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Demonstrators gather outside of The United States Supreme Court during an oral arguments in Gill v. Whitford to call for an end to partisan gerrymandering on October 3, 2017 in Washington, DC. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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