Asma Khalid Asma Khalid is a White House correspondent for NPR. She also co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.
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Asma Khalid

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Asma Khalid 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Asma Khalid

White House Correspondent

Asma Khalid is a White House correspondent for NPR. She also co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.

Khalid is a bit of a campaign-trail addict, having reported on the 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 elections.

She joined NPR's Washington team in 2016 to focus on the intersection of demographics and politics.

During the 2020 presidential campaign, she covered the crowded Democratic primary field, and then went on to report on Joe Biden's candidacy.

Her reporting often dives into the political, cultural and racial divides in the country.

Before joining NPR's political team, Khalid was a reporter for Boston's NPR station WBUR, where she was nearly immediately flung into one of the most challenging stories of her career — the Boston Marathon bombings. She had joined the network just a few weeks prior, but went on to report on the bombings, the victims, and the reverberations throughout the city. She also covered Boston's failed Olympic bid and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Later, she led a new business and technology team at the station that reported on the future of work.

In addition to countless counties across America, Khalid's reporting has taken her to Pakistan, the United Kingdom and China.

She got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but she fell in love with radio through an internship at the BBC Newshour in London during graduate school.

She's been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, CNN's Inside Politics and PBS's Washington Week.

Her reporting has been recognized with the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Gracie Award.

A native of Crown Point, Ind., Khalid is a graduate of Indiana University in Bloomington. She has also studied at the University of Cambridge, the London School of Economics, the American University in Beirut and Middlebury College's Arabic school.

Story Archive

Senate Republicans Blocked A Key Vote On The Infrastructure Bill

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Vice President Harris spoke to NPR on Tuesday about the administration's efforts to protect voting rights. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Transcript: Vice President Harris On Voting Rights, The Filibuster And The Courts

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Vice President Harris speaks about voting rights at the White House complex on June 23. President Biden tapped her to lead the administration's efforts on the issue. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Vice President Harris Hints That She Has Discussed Filibuster Changes With Senators

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The executive order unveiled Friday includes plans to make it easier for people to fix their phones or other equipment themselves. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

How New Biden Rules Could Make It Easier To Buy Hearing Aids Or Fix Your Phone

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White House press secretary Jen Psaki and Brian Deese, director of the National Economic Council, take questions from reporters on Friday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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President Biden, pictured as a senator introducing anti-crime legislation in 2007, is trying to maintain his long-standing relationships with law enforcement as he pushes for changes to policing. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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An Old Friend Of Law Enforcement, Biden Walks A Thin Line On Police Reform

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Politics Chat: Biden Does Not Meet July 4th Vaccination Goal

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We Just Got Our Clearest Picture Yet Of How Biden Won In 2020

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