Jewly Hight NPR Music contributor.
Jewly Hight
Stories By

Jewly Hight

The Journey Took Madi Diaz To Creating Her New Album, 'History Of A Feeling'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1032555109/1033727699" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I never made judgments in my songs," Tom T. Hall said. "I had a lot of good characters, a lot of bad characters. But I never bragged on the good guys and I never condemned the losers." Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

"I believe that the body and the mind and the spirit have to be completely aligned in order for extreme joy to be realized," says Torres' Mackenzie Scott. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Allison Russell Marc Baptiste hide caption

toggle caption
Marc Baptiste

Singer Allison Russell Shares Personal Saga Of Trauma And Triumph On 'Outside Child'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1000521784/1000616948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Miko Marks' latest album is Our Country. Throughout her career, she's deepened her connection to her ancestors while elaborating on the possibilities of all the styles that speak to her. Beto Lopez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Beto Lopez/Courtesy of the artist

In the past year, Joy Oladokun has been tapped for visibility-boosting initiatives, performed on late-night shows and had her songs placed on primetime TV. Noah Tidmore/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Noah Tidmore/Courtesy of the artist

Country artists like Miko Marks, Rissi Palmer, Mickey Guyton and Willie Jones are making standout music despite the confines of an industry that privileges whiteness. Beto Lopez, Samantha Everette, Rick Diamond/Getty Images, Duane Prokop/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Beto Lopez, Samantha Everette, Rick Diamond/Getty Images, Duane Prokop/Getty Images

Dale Ann Bradley (left), Tina Adair, Gena Britt and Deanie Richardson (center) of the bluegrass band Sister Sadie do their impression of the rock band Queen. Jon Roncolato/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Roncolato/Courtesy of the artist

Bluegrass Band Sister Sadie Embodies Tradition, But Bends It Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/951409929/952626104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nashville's music industry has never given homegrown hip-hop the support it deserves, so the city's artists and entrepreneurs are creating their own institutions. ilbusca/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ilbusca/Getty Images

Hip-Hop In Nashville Is Making Its Own Way

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/928328328/931643113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript