Jewly Hight NPR Music contributor.
Jewly Hight
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Jewly Hight

Jewly Hight
Katie Kauss for NPR

Jewly Hight

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Willie Jones. His latest full-length, Right Now, is on our shortlist of the best new albums out on Jan. 22. Gordon Clark/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Gordon Clark/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The Top 8 Albums Out On Jan. 22

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Dale Ann Bradley (left), Tina Adair, Gena Britt and Deanie Richardson (center) of the bluegrass band Sister Sadie do their impression of the rock band Queen. Jon Roncolato/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jon Roncolato/Courtesy of the artist

Bluegrass Band Sister Sadie Embodies Tradition, But Bends It Too

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Nashville's music industry has never given homegrown hip-hop the support it deserves, so the city's artists and entrepreneurs are creating their own institutions. ilbusca/Getty Images hide caption

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ilbusca/Getty Images

Hip-Hop In Nashville Is Making Its Own Way

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Bandleader Raul Malo and guitarist Eddie Perez both claim Latin American heritage, but their roots music-driven band had never ventured into creating an entirely Spanish album until now. Alejandro Menéndez Vega/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alejandro Menéndez Vega/Courtesy of the artist

The Mavericks Are Back, This Time 'En Español'

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A parking lot in Nashville, photographed on Mar. 31, 2020, after Tennessee's governor issued a stay-at-home order in response to the developing coronavirus crisis. Danielle Del Valle/Getty Images hide caption

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Danielle Del Valle/Getty Images

As the profile of the masked, pseudonymous singer Orville Peck has risen, he has sometimes been held up as a solitary figure staking a queer claim to country music. But in important ways, Peck isn't alone. Tracy Hua/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tracy Hua/Courtesy of the artist

Jake Blount is a banjo and fiddle player and queer activist. His new album, Spider Tales, links country and bluegrass traditions in America with roots in African mythology. Michelle Lotker/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Michelle Lotker/Courtesy of the artist