Felix Contreras Felix Contreras is host of Alt.Latino, NPR's program about Latin Alternative music and Latino culture.
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Felix Contreras

Felix Contreras. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

Felix Contreras

Host, Alt.Latino

Felix Contreras is co-creator and host of Alt.Latino, NPR's pioneering program about Latin Alternative music and Latino culture. It features music as well as interviews with many of the most well-known Latinx musicians, actors, filmmakers, and writers. He has hosted and produced Alt.Latino episodes from Mexico, Colombia, Cuba, and throughout the U.S. since the show started in 2010.

Previously, Contreras was a reporter and producer NPR's Arts Desk and, among other stories and projects, covered a series reported from Mexico on the musical movement called Latin Alternative; helped produce NPR's award-winning series 50 Great Voices; and reported a series of stories on the financial challenges aging jazz musicians face.

Contreras is a recovering television journalist who has worked for both NBC and Univision in Miami and California. He's a part-time musician who plays Afro-Cuban percussion with various jazz and Latin bands in the Washington, DC, area. He is also NPR Music's resident Deadhead.

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Los Gaiteros De San Jacinto on the cover of its 2006 album Un Fuego de Sangre Pura. Jorge Mario Múnera/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways hide caption

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Jorge Mario Múnera/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways

Cumbia: The Musical Backbone Of Latin America

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J Balvin, Cardi B and Bad Bunny perform onstage during the 2018 American Music Awards. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images For dcp) Kevin Winter/Getty Images For dcp hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images For dcp

Lido Pimienta's Miss Colombia received a Latin Grammy nomination for best alternative music album. Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the artist

We Look At The 2020 Latin Grammy Nominations

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Clockwise from upper left: Masego, Adrianne Lenker, La Dame Blanche, Theo Alexander and Waylon Payne. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

NPR Music's No. 1 Albums And Songs Of September

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Santana in 1970 (left to right): Carlos Santana, José "Chepito" Areas, Mike Carabello, David Brown, Gregg Rolie and Mike Shrieve. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

50 Years Later, Santana's 'Abraxas' Still Changes The Game

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From left to right, some of the Latinx figures we think deserve monuments: Ivy Queen, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sonia Manzano and Anacaona. Rodrigo Varela; Ron Galella Collection; David Livingston; The Civilization, volume III, 1882/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodrigo Varela; Ron Galella Collection; David Livingston; The Civilization, volume III, 1882/Getty Images

Latinx Monuments We'd Like To See

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Graciela Iturbide's Mujer Ángel (Angel Woman), from 1979, was taken in the Sonoran Desert. Graciela Iturbide/Museum of Women in the Arts hide caption

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Graciela Iturbide/Museum of Women in the Arts

Graciela Iturbide, The Artistic Soul Of Mexico

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Devendra Banhart is one of two artists featured on this week's episode. Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist

Roots Grow Outward

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Rita Indiana released one of our favorite albums this week. Noelie Quintero/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Noelie Quintero/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The Top 8 Albums Out Sept. 11

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The Texicana Mamas (left to right): Tish Hinojosa, Stephanie Urbina Jones, Patricia Vonne. The trio's self-titled debut album is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

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Vocalist Gloria Estefan reimagines some of her classic music through a Brazilian lens. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Gloria Estefan: 'It's All About The Drums,' This Time From Brazil

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The rapper, singer and New York Times bestselling author Lecrae. His latest release, Restoration, is on our shortlist for the best new albums out on Aug. 21. Alex Harper/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alex Harper/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The Top 8 Albums Out On August 21

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