Felix Contreras Felix Contreras is host of Alt.Latino, NPR's program about Latin Alternative music and Latino culture.
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Felix Contreras

Felix Contreras. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

Felix Contreras

Host, Alt.Latino

Felix Contreras is co-creator and host of Alt.Latino, NPR's pioneering program about Latin Alternative music and Latino culture. It features music as well as interviews with many of the most well-known Latinx musicians, actors, filmmakers, and writers. He has hosted and produced Alt.Latino episodes from Mexico, Colombia, Cuba, and throughout the U.S. since the show started in 2010.

Previously, Contreras was a reporter and producer NPR's Arts Desk and, among other stories and projects, covered a series reported from Mexico on the musical movement called Latin Alternative; helped produce NPR's award-winning series 50 Great Voices; and reported a series of stories on the financial challenges aging jazz musicians face.

Contreras is a recovering television journalist who has worked for both NBC and Univision in Miami and California. He's a part-time musician who plays Afro-Cuban percussion with various jazz and Latin bands in the Washington, DC, area. He is also NPR Music's resident Deadhead.

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Story Archive

Chuck Berry is one of the early rock and roll artists who were inspired by Latin music. Terry Fincher/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Fincher/Getty Images

The Cuban Roots Of Rock And Roll

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Mariachi Herencia de Mexico features teenagers from Chicago with a passion for tradition. Carafotos/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Carafotos/Courtesy of the artist

Heritage Month Special: Mexican Music Then And Now

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Cuban vocalist Daymé Arocena is featured on a new solo album with the all-female Cuban jazz band Maqueque. Pablo Devin Reyes Maulin/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Pablo Devin Reyes Maulin/Courtesy of the artist

Music For Fall: Daymé Arocena, Devandra Banhart And Alex Cuba

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The crowd at Los Dells Festival in Wisconsin celebrates music and identity. Gabriella Cisneros/Courtesy of Radio Milwaukee hide caption

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Gabriella Cisneros/Courtesy of Radio Milwaukee

Latin Music In The Heartland

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Santana's cultural mash-up made a statement about Latin music that still reverberates to this day. Tucker Ranson/Getty Images hide caption

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Tucker Ranson/Getty Images

Santana's Debut Album Turns 50 Years Old

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Guest DJ: Fabi Reyna, She Shreds Magazine Founder And Musician

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