Laura Sullivan Laura Sullivan is an NPR News investigative correspondent whose work has cast a light on some of the country's most significant issues.
Laura Sullivan - 2015
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Laura Sullivan

Tuesday

Reexamining the one-sided history depicted on markers in the U.S.

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Sunday

A historical marker in Alabama unearths a long-forgotten cold case

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Wednesday

Monday

Historical markers in America: the good, the bad and the quirky

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A historic road marker tells the story of a forgotten murder

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Sunday

A century-long effort to recast the Civil War

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The historical marker that omits parts of the Young-Dent family's past is on the grounds of Fendall Hall in Eufaula. The back side of the marker says Edward Brown Young was a "banker, merchant and entrepreneur." The back side also says that he "organized the company which built the first bridge" in Eufaula and that his daughter married a Confederate captain in the "War Between the States." Andi Rice for NPR hide caption

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Andi Rice for NPR

Historical markers are everywhere in America. Some get history wrong

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Monday

An employee examines a vanadium flow battery stack in the Battery Reliability Test Laboratory at PNNL. Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hide caption

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Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Congress tightens U.S. manufacturing rules after battery technology ends up in China

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Monday

Plastic covers the ground in a neighborhood in Indonesia. The country has battled the dumping of U.S. plastic recycling for years across its once pristine islands and waterways. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Monday

Unwanted used plastic sits outside Garten Services, a recycling facility in Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Recycling plastic is practically impossible — and the problem is getting worse

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Wednesday

The former UniEnergy Technologies office in Mukilteo, Wash. Taxpayers spent $15 million on research to build a breakthrough battery. Then the U.S. government gave it to China. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

The U.S. made a breakthrough battery discovery — then gave the technology to China

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Thursday

The office of California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced it is investigating oil and gas companies for allegedly deceiving the public into believing most plastic could be recycled. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Monday

Plastic piles up at Garten Services in Salem, Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Thursday

Abdul Hadi Nejrabi, the deputy ambassador, is one of the few employees left at the Afghan Embassy. "We choose to serve the people," he says. "That's the reason we are here." Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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In Washington, the last employees at the Afghan Embassy work until the lights go off

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