Laura Sullivan Laura Sullivan is an NPR News investigative correspondent whose work has cast a light on some of the country's most significant issues.
Laura Sullivan - 2015
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Laura Sullivan

Linda Fittante
Laura Sullivan - 2015
Linda Fittante

Laura Sullivan

Correspondent, NPR Investigations

Laura Sullivan is an NPR News investigative correspondent whose work has cast a light on some of the country's most significant issues.

Sullivan is one of NPR's most decorated journalists, with three Peabody Awards and three Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Batons. She joined NPR in 2004 as a correspondent on the National Desk, covering crime and punishment issues. She joined NPR's investigations unit in 2010. Her investigative reports air regularly on All Things Considered and Morning Edition.

She is also an on-air correspondent for the PBS television show FRONTLINE. Her investigations have examined the disparity between wealthy and poor hospitals in 2021, how Big Oil misled the public about recycling in 2020, the U.S. relationship with China in 2019, the Blackout in Puerto Rico in 2018, the crisis in affordable housing in 2017 and the Business of Disaster in May 2016, which examined who profits when disaster strikes. The film and radio pieces grew out of a series of investigations examining the American Red Cross in the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake and Superstorm Sandy. The pieces were honored with her second award from Harvard University's Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press and her third from Investigative Reporters and Editors.

Sullivan won her third duPont in 2022 for her Planet Money podcast WASTE LAND, an investigation with Frontline into Big Oil and the myth of recycling plastic. The California's attorney general opened an investigation into the oil companies citing NPR's reporting, saying the companies participated in a "half century of deception" perpetuating a myth that plastic could be recycled in an effort to manipulate the public to buy more of it.

Her unflinching series "Native Foster Care," which aired in three parts on All Things Considered in October 2011, examined how lack of knowledge about Native culture and traditions and federal financial funding all influence the decision to remove so many Native-American children from homes in South Dakota. Through more than 150 interviews with state and federal officials, tribal representatives and families from eight South Dakota tribes, plus a review of thousands of records, Sullivan and NPR producers pieced together a narrative of inequality in the foster care system across the state. In addition to her third Peabody, the series also won Sullivan her second Robert F. Kennedy Award.

"Bonding for Profit" – a three-part investigative series that aired on Morning Edition and All Things Considered in 2010 – earned Sullivan her second duPont and Peabody, as well as awards from the Scripps Howard Foundation, Harvard University's Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, and the American Bar Association. Working with editor Steve Drummond, Sullivan's stories in this series revealed deep and costly flaws in one of the most common – and commonly misunderstood – elements of the US criminal justice system.

Also in 2011, Sullivan was honored for the second time by Investigative Reporters and Editors for her two part series examining the origins of Arizona's controversial immigration law SB 1070.

For the three-part series, "36 Years of Solitary: Murder, Death and Justice on Angola," she was honored with a 2008 George Foster Peabody Award, a 2008 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award, and her first Robert F. Kennedy Award.

In 2007, Sullivan exposed the epidemic of rape on Native American reservations, which are committed largely by non-Native men, and examined how tribal and federal authorities have failed to investigate those crimes. In addition to a duPont, this two-part series earned Sullivan a DART Award for outstanding reporting, an Edward R. Murrow and her second Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media.

Her first Gracie was for a three-part series examining of the state of solitary confinement in this country. She was also awarded the 2007 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for this series.

Before coming to NPR, Sullivan was a Washington correspondent for The Baltimore Sun, where she covered the Justice Department, the FBI and terrorism.

As a student at Northwestern University in 1996, Sullivan worked with two fellow students on a project that ultimately freed four men, including two death-row inmates, who had been wrongfully convicted of an 18-year-old murder on the south side of Chicago. The case led to a review of Illinois' death row and a moratorium on capital punishment in the state, and received several awards.

Outside of her career as a reporter, Sullivan once spent a summer gutting fish in Alaska, and another summer cutting trails outside Yosemite National Park. She says these experiences gave her "a sense of adventure" that comes through in her reporting. Sullivan, who was born and raised in San Francisco, loves traveling the country to report radio stories that "come to life in a way that was never possible in print."

Story Archive

The former UniEnergy Technologies office in Mukilteo, Wash. Taxpayers spent $15 million on research to build a breakthrough battery. Then the U.S. government gave it to China. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

The U.S. made a breakthrough battery discovery — then gave the technology to China

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The office of California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced it is investigating oil and gas companies for allegedly deceiving the public into believing most plastic could be recycled. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Plastic piles up at Garten Services in Salem, Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Waste land (Bonus)

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Abdul Hadi Nejrabi, the deputy ambassador, is one of the few employees left at the Afghan Embassy. "We choose to serve the people," he says. "That's the reason we are here." Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

In Washington, the last employees at the Afghan Embassy work until the lights go off

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White House Declassifies FBI Report Detailing Saudi Nationals' Connections To 9/11

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The partially redacted FBI report paints a closer relationship than had been previously known between two Saudis in particular — including one with diplomatic status — and some of the hijackers. Diane Bondareff/AP hide caption

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Diane Bondareff/AP

Biden Declassifies Secret FBI Report Detailing Saudi Nationals' Connections To 9/11

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Families Of 9/11 Victims May Get Answers When Classified Government Records Release

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Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center is one of the largest safety-net hospitals in the United States. Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospitals Serving The Poor Struggled During COVID. Wealthy Hospitals Made Millions

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Recycled plastic pellets are displayed at a facility in Ontario. James MacDonald/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Big Oil Evaded Regulation And Plastic Pellets Kept Spilling

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C'Artis Harris, walking with her children in 2017, was searching for housing that would accept her Section 8 voucher when NPR began following her in 2016. Today, Harris and her family still live in an area of high poverty. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Trump Stokes Fear In The Suburbs, But Few Low-Income Families Ever Make It There

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Plastic piles up at Garten Services in Salem, Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Waste Land

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Landfill workers bury all plastic except soda bottles and milk jugs at Rogue Disposal & Recycling in southern Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

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New Jersey first lady Tammy Murphy, left, distributes bags containing meals and face masks, at the NAN Newark Tech World in Newark, N.J., on May 6. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Much Of The Stimulus Aid Sent To States Hasn't Gone Where It's Needed Most

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Banks Rake In $17 Billion In Fees For Small Business Relief Program

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