Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's Newsdesk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's Newsdesk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She will be the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Japan's Foreign Minister Taro Kono plans to ask overseas news outlets to write Japanese names with the family name first, as is the custom in Japan. Kono is seen here last month in Washington. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., speaks at an abortion-rights rally at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. It was part of a day of action nationwide to protest a wave of state laws restricting abortion. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Rabbit by Jeff Koons was sold for more than $91 million at Christie's in New York on Wednesday night. It set a record for the most expensive work by a living artist to be sold at auction. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Former media baron Conrad Black was pardoned by President Trump on Wednesday. Black (center) is seen here following a 2011 hearing in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is calling on governments and tech companies to do more to prevent livestreaming of terrorist attacks and the spread of such videos online. Ardern is seen here laying a wreath at the Auckland War Memorial Museum in Auckland last month. Mark Tantrum/The New Zealand Government via Getty Images hide caption

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The State Department ordered "non-emergency" U.S. government employees out of Iraq on Wednesday. A helicopter carrying U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is seen taking off from Baghdad International Airport last week. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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On Wednesday, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed into law a ban on nearly all abortions. Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP hide caption

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Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP

Alabama Governor Signs Abortion Ban Into Law

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U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday after China retaliated for President Trump's latest round of tariffs. Here, a trader works on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange as a TV shows the state of the market. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Late night TV host Conan O'Brien, pictured in 2016, has settled a lawsuit with a man who accused O'Brien and his writing staff of stealing his jokes. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

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The Alabama Senate postponed a vote on a highly restrictive abortion bill after controversy over an amendment that would provide an exception in cases of rape or incest. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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A bipartisan group of attorneys general is urging Congress to pass legislation that would make it easier for banks to handle money involved in the legal cannabis industry. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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