Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

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Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Life Kit: Tips To Strengthen Your Digital Privacy

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Washington State Department of Agriculture entomologists used radio trackers to find a nest of invasive Asian giant hornets in the cavity of a tree. The state now plans to destroy the nest. Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture hide caption

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Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture

A health worker injects a woman during clinical trials for a COVID-19 vaccine last month in Hollywood, Fla. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

National Transportation Safety Board member Jennifer Homendy (right) walks with other NTSB officials past a makeshift memorial for victims of the Conception boat fire in September 2019 in Santa Barbara, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A photo taken in July shows what's left of the Jeffrey asbestos mine in Asbestos, Quebec. The town has voted to change its name to Val-des-Sources. Eric Thomas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thomas/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S.-Canada border at Pittsburg, N.H., in 2017. The U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico will stay closed to nonessential travel through Nov. 21. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

Bernard Cohen in a 1970s campaign poster when he ran for the Virginia House of Delegates. As a lawyer he successfully argued the Supreme Court case that established the legality of interracial marriage. He died this week at age 86. Cohen family hide caption

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Cohen family

A new study has found that home sale prices and volume appear to be declining in Florida coastal areas at vulnerable-to-rising sea levels compared to coastal areas with less risk. Here, the balcony view from a luxury condo in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., in 2017. Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

Wells Fargo has fired more than 100 employees whom it says personally defrauded a pandemic relief program from the Small Business Administration. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Mark and Patricia McCloskey leave a court hearing Wednesday in St. Louis. The McCloskeys pleaded not guilty to unlawful use of a weapon and tampering with evidence. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

A judge has blocked an emergency order issued last week by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers' administration that caps the capacity of bars and other indoor establishments. Wisconsin Department of Health Services/AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Department of Health Services/AP

The phase 3 trial of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been paused as the company investigates what it says is a study participant's "unexplained illness." Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP
Jackie Ferrentino for NPR

Your Technology Is Tracking You. Take These Steps For Better Online Privacy

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