Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Elon Musk's acquisition of Twitter has spurred many longtime users to look for alternative social networks. Amy Osborne/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Osborne/AFP via Getty Images

Olivia Pichardo, 18, has been named to Brown University's baseball team. She's the first woman named to the roster of a Division I baseball team in the U.S. Brown University Athletics hide caption

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Brown University Athletics

Barbora Krejcikova, top right, and Katerina Siniakova of the Czech Republic, celebrate after beating China's Shuai Zhang, bottom left, and Belgium's Elise Mertens during the final of the women's doubles at the Wimbledon tennis championships in July. Wimbledon is relaxing its requirement for all-white clothing to allow female players to wear colored undershorts. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Amazon plans to lay off 10 thousand employees, following job cuts at Meta, Twitter

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The match ball used in the 1986 FIFA World Cup football match between Argentina and England is pictured ahead of its auction, at Wembley Stadium in London on Nov. 1. Isabel Infantes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Isabel Infantes/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto is seen Monday. The Democrat defeated Adam Laxalt, a Trump-backed Republican and former Nevada attorney general. The win means Democrats retain the U.S. Senate. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

A customer is handed Powerball tickets purchased at Lichine's Liquor & Deli in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday. Monday night's drawing was worth a record $2.04 billion. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Africa's last remaining glaciers, including on Mount Kilimanjaro, are expected to melt by 2050. The mountain is seen here in 2009. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen began researching whether turtle species — and other vertebrates thought to be mute — make sounds by recording his own pet turtles. The hydrophone used for recording can be seen on the left. Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen hide caption

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Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen

Dozens of species were assumed to be mute — until they were recorded making sounds

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What sound does a turtle make?

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Demonstrators gather on the steps to the Texas State Capitol in Austin to speak against transgender-related bills being considered in the state legislature in May 2021. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP