Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's Newsdesk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's Newsdesk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She will be the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

France will levy a 3% tax on digital companies that make large profits in the country. French Economy and Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire, who championed the measure, is seen here on Wednesday in Paris. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Labor Secretary Alex Acosta on Wednesday defended a 2008 plea deal made with Jeffrey Epstein, a wealthy financier accused of yearslong sex trafficking of minors. The deal was made when Acosta was a U.S. attorney in Florida. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

A three-judge panel ordered the dismissal of a lawsuit that argued President Trump was violating the emoluments clauses of the Constitution through his business empire. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

Megan Rapinoe and the U.S. squad won a lot of fans on their way to winning the Women's World Cup on Sunday in Lyon, France. For the sport to keep growing, that support needs to continue long after the ticker tape lands. Alex Grimm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Grimm/Getty Images

Federal prosecutors announced charges of sex trafficking against wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein on Monday. Epstein is seen here in 2005. Patrick McMullan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick McMullan/Getty Images

U.S. Faces The Netherlands In World Cup Final

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/739288248/739288249" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Netherlands are the last team standing between the United States and its fourth Women's World Cup. Here, U.S. forward Megan Rapinoe watches her teammates warm up before Tuesday's 2-1 semifinal win over England. Alex Grimm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Grimm/Getty Images

People hike on the Byron Glacier on Thursday in Girdwood, Alaska, southeast of Anchorage. Many cities set heat records amid unusually hot and dry conditions in the area. Lance King/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lance King/Getty Images

One Woman's Quest To Get Back Her Vegetable Garden Results In New Florida Law

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/738791507/738791508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A search team looks for a 2-year-old girl who went missing in the Rio Grande near the border city of Del Rio, Texas. U.S. Customs and Border Protection hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Homeowners Tom Carroll and Hermine Ricketts held a ceremonial planting of vegetables in their garden on Monday. The Village of Miami Shores had prohibited front-yard gardens, but the Florida Legislature passed a law that assures such gardens' legality. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Wilfredo Lee/AP

U.S. forward Megan Rapinoe celebrates after scoring her team's second goal during Friday's quarterfinal match against France. The Americans now face an England squad that brings confidence and defensive power. Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

Oregon's Legislature passed a bill that would allow duplexes, like this one in Portland, in areas zoned for single-family housing in cities with more than 10,000 people. Michael Andersen/Sightline Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Andersen/Sightline Institute

Sudanese protesters flash the V-sign during a mass demonstration in Khartoum on Sunday against Sudan's ruling generals. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images