Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, announced new guidelines on Wednesday for critical infrastructure workers who may have been exposed to the coronavirus to return to work. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

With baseball season on hold, Fenway Park organist Josh Kantor streams a show from his home each afternoon. He uses his encyclopedic knowledge of music to play requests, and he urges donations to local food banks. Mary Eaton hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Eaton

Nadia, a Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York, has tested positive for the new coronavirus. It's believed to be the first known infection in an animal in the U.S. Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society/AP

A family in Kent, England, posted a parody of the song "One Day More" from Les Misérables, with new words about their life under strict lockdown measures in the U.K. due to the coronavirus. Screengrab by NPR/Ben Marsh on Facebook hide caption

toggle caption
Screengrab by NPR/Ben Marsh on Facebook

French secretary of state for equality between men and women, Marlène Schiappa, in Paris in 2017. Philippe Lopez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Philippe Lopez/AFP via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there's no evidence that pets can contract or spread the coronavirus. But you still may want to keep your dog away from other people right now. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Max Posner/NPR
zoranm/Getty Images

Nurses Are Facing Coronavirus Without Enough Protective Gear

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/820788936/820795724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gen. Joseph Lengyel, Chief of the U.S. National Guard Bureau, is seen here in 2018. More than 8,100 members of the National Guard have been mobilized across the U.S. to help during the coronavirus crisis. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bullit Marquez/AP

Coronavirus: 2 Key Questions For The Head Of The National Guard

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/820312778/820348338" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As people make efforts to stay apart from each other physically, video games are filling the socializing gap. Sara Monika/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sara Monika/Getty Images