Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Work crews remove the statue of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson on Wednesday in Richmond, Va. The city's mayor, Levar Stoney, has ordered the immediate removal of multiple Confederate statues in the city, saying he was using his emergency powers to speed up their removal for public safety. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

On Wednesday, the U.N. Security Council approved a 90-day cease-fire in global conflict zones due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Security Council is seen here in February at U.N. headquarters in New York City. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Golden State Killer suspect Joseph James DeAngelo (center) pleaded guilty on Monday in Sacramento, Calif., to 13 murders and other related charges. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The Supreme Court effectively refused to block the execution of four federal prison inmates who are scheduled to be put to death in the coming weeks. The executions would be the first use of the death penalty at the federal level since 2003. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said the state will put a hold on further reopening as it contends with rising numbers of coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. Lynda M. Gonzalez/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Lynda M. Gonzalez/Pool/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies Tuesday during a House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing on the Trump administration's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images

Football coach Bob Wager (right) and sophomore safety Cameron Conley greet each other Thursday at the reopening of strength and conditioning camp at Martin High School in Arlington, Texas. State officials say they plan to open schools for in-person instruction in the fall. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Students and supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals rally in downtown Los Angeles in November while the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about the program. The court's ruling Thursday will uphold DACA for now. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The Board of Trustees at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill voted to lift a moratorium on renaming campus buildings and memorials. About 30 campus buildings are thought to have namesakes with ties to white supremacy or slavery. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Texas has seen a recent uptick in the number of COVID-19 cases, with a record level of new cases and hospitalizations announced Tuesday. People are seen here Monday along the San Antonio River Walk. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Dr. Ashley Bloomfield, New Zealand's director-general of health, pictured last week, said Tuesday that two women flying in from the U.K. via Australia had tested positive for the coronavirus and had been in isolation since their arrival. Marty Melville/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Marty Melville/AFP via Getty Images