Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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The Tongass National Forest, near Ketchikan, Alaska. The Trump Administration is set to remove long-standing protections against logging and development in the forest. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Magawa, a rat that has been trained to detect explosives, was awarded the PDSA Gold Medal on Friday for bravery in searching out unexploded land mines in Cambodia. PDSA via AP hide caption

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PDSA via AP

A guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region in December 2018. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

An entrance to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee was vandalized last weekend with the skin of a black bear and a sign that read "Here To The Lake Black Lives Don't Matter." U.S. National Park Service hide caption

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U.S. National Park Service

Members of a rescue crew work to free a whale from a sandbar off the coast of Tasmania, Australia, on Tuesday. About 380 pilot whales have died in the mass stranding, one of the largest ever recorded. Brodie Weeding/AP hide caption

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Brodie Weeding/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines for a safe Halloween during the COVID-19 pandemic include new methods of doing classic spooky activities. ArtMarie/Getty Images hide caption

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention briefly posted new guidance to its website stating that the coronavirus can commonly be transmitted through aerosol particles, which can be produced by activities like singing. Here, choristers wear face masks during a music festival in southwestern France in July. Bob Edme/AP hide caption

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Bob Edme/AP

Rafaela Vasquez has been charged with negligent homicide in the death of a pedestrian struck by an autonomous Uber SUV in March 2018. Vasquez was at the wheel of the vehicle at the time. Tempe Police Department via AP hide caption

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Tempe Police Department via AP

A firefighter sprays water on a controlled burn Sunday while fighting the Dolan Fire near Big Sur, Calif. Millions of acres have burned in California and neighboring states this year. Nic Coury/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nic Coury/Bloomberg via Getty Images

George Washington University is "looking into the situation" of history professor Jessica A. Krug, after a blog post written under that name said that she had invented her Black Caribbean identity, despite actually being white. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

International Criminal Court Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda, seen here in 2018, has been added to the U.S. Treasury's sanctions list. She is leading the court's investigation into alleged U.S. war crimes in Afghanistan. Bas Czerwinski/AP hide caption

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Bas Czerwinski/AP

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says that beginning Sept. 15, it will no longer reimburse states for personal protective equipment in nonemergency settings, including schools or courthouses. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images