Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Faced with hundreds of sexual abuse lawsuits, the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Gutierrez/AP

Boy Scouts Of America Files For Bankruptcy As It Faces Hundreds Of Sex-Abuse Claims

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/806721827/806926231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American evacuees from the Diamond Princess cruise ship arrive at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland on Monday in San Antonio, Texas. Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images

A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that blocked work requirements in Arkansas and in Kentucky, which has since rescinded them. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar is seen testifying before the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

U.S. Women's Soccer Team Has A New Ally In Equal Pay Fight: The Men's National Team

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805760480/805760481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators and spectators gather around the toppled Confederate statue known as Silent Sam in August 2018 at UNC-Chapel Hill in North Carolina. A judge has overturned a settlement that the UNC System made with the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Julia Wall/Raleigh News & Observer/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Wall/Raleigh News & Observer/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

After the messy reporting of the Iowa caucus results, some who build tech for progressive causes say the approach to software development in this space needs rethinking. Daniel Acke/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acke/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A federal judge ruled in favor of T-Mobile's takeover of Sprint in a merger that would combine the country's third- and fourth-largest wireless carriers. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bebeto Matthews/AP

Judge Rules In Favor Of T-Mobile Takeover Of Sprint

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/804848534/804968643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Finland's government, led by Prime Minister Sanna Marin, announced it will extend family leave for both parents to nearly seven months. Marin is seen here arriving at an EU summit in Brussels in December. Christian Hartmann/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Christian Hartmann/AP

Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer says he will drop the charges against an orthopedic surgeon who appeared in a reality TV dating show, at a news conference in Santa Ana, Calif., on Tuesday. He cited insufficient evidence in the case. Amy Taxin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Taxin/AP