Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

Story Archive

There are calls for more safety measures after deadly NYC high-rise fire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1074664331/1074664332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NYC high-rise fire displaces hundreds. How do they find affordable housing?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072678618/1072678619" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Regan Adams at her home in northeast Knoxville. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Home prices are up. For Black families, is selling Grandma's house the right choice?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1065761691/1068430216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Royal Caribbean's Symphony of the Seas cruise ship, seen docked in Miami in March 2020, saw 48 cases of COVID-19 on its most recent seven-day sailing. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People queue outside the newly set up vaccination center at London's Wembley Stadium to receive a COVID-19 vaccine or booster on Sunday, as the booster rollout accelerates in England and case numbers spike. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

Former Brooklyn Center Police Officer Kim Potter testifies in court on Friday at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Potter is charged with first and second-degree manslaughter in the April 11 shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black motorist, following a traffic stop. Court TV/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Court TV/AP

All 17 missionaries kidnapped by a gang in Haiti have been released

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1064951653/1064951654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How inflation affects low-income people

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1061028411/1061028412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prosecutor Linda Dunikoski presents a closing argument to the jury during the trial of Travis McMichael, Gregory McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan on Monday at the Glynn County Courthouse in Brunswick, Georgia. The three men are charged in the February 2020 killing of Ahmaud Arbery. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen B. Morton/AP

Several cities are reviving interest in rent stabilization

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054884186/1054884187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rising food prices have resulted in both food insecurity and improvisation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054032209/1054032210" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Los Angeles International Airport and SoFi Stadium employers spoke with potential job applicants at a job fair in Inglewood, Calif., in September. About 19% of all households in an NPR poll say they lost all their savings during the COVID-19 outbreak, and have none to fall back on. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Black and Latino families continue to bear pandemic's great economic toll in U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1048202711/1049042534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Haitian gang wants $1 million ransom for each of the 17 kidnapped missionaries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1047735135/1047735136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Black and Latino families are bearing the weight of the pandemic's economic toll

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1047400808/1047400809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript