Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

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Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Fire swept through Australia's Wollemi National Park, but firefighters were able to save rare groves of prehistoric Wollemi pines. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service via Reuters hide caption

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New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service via Reuters

BlackRock Chairman and CEO Larry Fink, seen here in Paris in July, wrote in his annual letter to CEOs that climate change will soon cause "a significant reallocation of capital." Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images

Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, seen here last week in London, conferred with other members of the royal family on Monday to discuss their status going forward. Daniel Leal-Olivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is seen here last week visiting Kangaroo Island, which was devastated by wildfires. David Mariuz/Getty Images hide caption

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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, also known as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, have announced that they will step back from certain royal duties. The couple is seen here on Tuesday in London. Chris Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

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The UNESCO-listed cultural site Naqsh-e Jahan Square in Isfahan, Iran, shown here in 2014, is known for its immense mosques, picturesque bridges and ancient bazaar. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Says He'll Target Iran's Cultural Sites. That's Illegal

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Iran announced Sunday that it will no longer limit its enrichment of uranium under the terms of the 2015 nuclear deal. Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif is seen here in Tehran in September 2019. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Police and rescuers work on the site of a plane crash near Almaty International Airport in Kazakhstan on Friday. A Bek Air flight crashed Friday shortly after takeoff, killing at least 12 people on board. Emergency Situations Ministry of the Republic of Kazakhstan via AP hide caption

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Emergency Situations Ministry of the Republic of Kazakhstan via AP

Many residents of a close-knit neighborhood in Newton, Mass., decided to learn American Sign Language when they found out the new kid on the block, Samantha Savitz, was born deaf. Glenda Savitz hide caption

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Glenda Savitz

Pope Francis called for compassion toward migrants in a Christmas Day speech from the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City. Alberto Pizzoli/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Pizzoli/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg confirmed a report on Tuesday that calls on behalf of his campaign were being made by prison workers. He is seen here campaigning in Philadelphia on Saturday. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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The number of babies born in Japan fell an estimated 5.9% this year, to under 900,000. Here, a baby is held aloft by a sumo wrestler during Tokyo's Nakizumo Festival in April. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images