Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

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Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Memorial Day weekend at Robert Moses State Park on Fire Island, N.Y. As the pandemic continues, Harvard's Dr. Ashish Jha says, mask wearing, social distancing and robust strategies of testing and contact tracing will be even more important. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nearing 100,000 COVID-19 Deaths, U.S. Is Still 'Early In This Outbreak'

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From Camping To Dining Out: Here's How Experts Rate The Risks Of 14 Summer Activities

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A nurse in the Eugenie Hospital in Ajaccio, on the French Mediterranean island of Corsica, on April 23. France appears to have had its first case of COVID-19 in December, a month earlier than doctors thought. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Bright, former director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, is seen here in 2018. Toya Sarno Jordan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Toya Sarno Jordan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A New York City worker closes a street to car traffic in Manhattan on Saturday so that pedestrians and cyclists can maintain social distancing. Mayor Bill de Blasio said 100 miles will be closed to car traffic in the coming weeks. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Clearwater Beach opened to the public on Monday with signs warning beachgoers to practice social distancing. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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A pulse oximeter provides a quick read on the saturation of oxygen in your blood. Some doctors believe it is a helpful device to have at home during the coronavirus pandemic. Others aren't so sure. vgajic/Getty Images hide caption

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Preliminary results of a study of the antiviral drug remdesivir show it is effective in shortening the recovery time for patients with COVID-19. Gilead Sciences via AP hide caption

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Gilead Sciences via AP

National security adviser Robert O'Brien told NPR that the White House is investigating Chinese funding of the World Health Organization. He is seen here earlier this month at the White House. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

National Security Adviser O'Brien Alleges WHO Is 'Propaganda Tool For The Chinese'

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, shown here on a banner at an anti-corruption rally on Sunday, has reached a deal for a unity government with his rival Benny Gantz. Amir Levy/Getty Images hide caption

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"Right now, there is no data on whether the UVA rays of the sun can inactivate this coronavirus," says Juan Leon, a virologist who focuses on environmental health at Emory University. ICHIRO/Getty Images hide caption

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ICHIRO/Getty Images