Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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Prosecutor Steve Schleicher gives closing arguments Monday in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin tells the judge on Thursday he will not testify on his own behalf in his trial over the death of George Floyd. His attorney, Eric Nelson, is seen at left. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Bottles of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson Janssen COVID-19 vaccine await transfer into syringes for administering in March in Los Angeles. The CDC had called on Tuesday for a pause in administering the vaccine. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. David Fowler testifies Wednesday in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin is on trial for charges of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Officer Rusten Sheskey "was found to have been acting within policy and will not be subjected to discipline," the Kenosha, Wis., police chief said, following a review of the shooting of Jacob Blake. Wisconsin Department of Justice via AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Department of Justice via AP

Minneapolis Park Police Officer Peter Chang testifies Tuesday in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin is charged in the death of George Floyd. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Shawanda Hill testifies Tuesday in the trial of Derek Chauvin. She said that as a police officer stood with a gun drawn outside the car she was in with George Floyd, Floyd grabbed the steering wheel and started saying, "Please, please don't kill me, please, please don't shoot me." Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

In this image from video, former paramedic Michelle Moseng testifies on Tuesday in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. Court TV/AP hide caption

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Court TV/AP

Philonise Floyd, George Floyd's younger brother, testifies Monday in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill discusses motions before the court Monday. He denied the defense request to question jurors again after a fatal police shooting Sunday and immediately sequester them in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Dr. Jonathan Rich, a cardiologist, testified on Monday that George Floyd "did not die from a primary cardiac event and he did not die from a drug overdose." Court TV via AP hide caption

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Court TV via AP

Boeing said Friday that some of its 737 Max planes may have an electrical problem, leading airlines to ground dozens of the jets. An American Airlines flight on a Boeing 737 Max is seen here in December in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Dr. Andrew Baker, the Hennepin County medical examiner, testifies Friday on the cause and manner of George Floyd's death. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP