Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

Allison Shelley/NPR
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

Story Archive

Some Players Aren't Convinced By US Soccer's 'Identical' Men's And Women's Contracts

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Tenants facing eviction wait to speak with attorneys from Memphis Area Legal Services in Room 134 of the Shelby County General Sessions Court in Memphis, Tenn. Liz Baker/NPR hide caption

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Rental Assistance Programs Are Swooping In To Help As Evictions Resume

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The Hallway, Not Courtroom, Is Where Things Really Get Done At This Eviction Court

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A man walks through a neighborhood of single-family homes in Los Angeles last week. The CDC announced a new temporary eviction ban a few days after the previous one expired. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Here's What You Need To Know About The New Eviction Ban

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How The New Eviction Ban Affects Millions Of Renters And Landlords

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U.S. star sprinter Allyson Felix, shown here in June during U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials, is competing this week at the Tokyo Olympics. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Pedestrians and cyclists head down Commercial Street in Provincetown, Mass., in May 2020. A study of a new outbreak in Provincetown found that three-quarters of those infected with the virus were fully vaccinated. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Tokyo reported 3,177 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, the highest number of infections recorded so far for the city. Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that city workers will be required to be vaccinated or get tested weekly for COVID-19. De Blasio is seen here in Brooklyn on Sunday at a rally in support of Haiti. Michael Appleton/ New York City Mayoral Photography Office hide caption

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Michael Appleton/ New York City Mayoral Photography Office

In a famous moment from the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith (center) and John Carlos raise their gloved fists after Smith received the gold medal and Carlos the bronze for the 200-meter run. AP hide caption

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