Laurel Wamsley Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features.
Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Laurel Wamsley

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Laurel Wamsley at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Laurel Wamsley

Reporter

Laurel Wamsley is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She reports breaking news for NPR's digital coverage, newscasts, and news magazines, as well as occasional features. She was also the lead reporter for NPR's coverage of the 2019 Women's World Cup in France.

Wamsley got her start at NPR as an intern for Weekend Edition Saturday in January 2007 and stayed on as a production assistant for NPR's flagship news programs, before joining the Washington Desk for the 2008 election.

She then left NPR, doing freelance writing and editing in Austin, Texas, and then working in various marketing roles for technology companies in Austin and Chicago.

In November 2015, Wamsley returned to NPR as an associate producer for the National Desk, where she covered stories including Hurricane Matthew in coastal Georgia. She became a Newsdesk reporter in March 2017, and has since covered subjects including climate change, possibilities for social networks beyond Facebook, the sex lives of Neanderthals, and joke theft.

In 2010, Wamsley was a Journalism and Women Symposium Fellow and participated in the German-American Fulbright Commission's Berlin Capital Program, and was a 2016 Voqal Foundation Fellow. She will spend two months reporting from Germany as a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow, a program of the International Center for Journalists.

Wamsley earned a B.A. with highest honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was a Morehead-Cain Scholar. Wamsley holds a master's degree from Ohio University, where she was a Public Media Fellow and worked at NPR Member station WOUB. A native of Athens, Ohio, she now lives and bikes in Washington, DC.

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New Zealand weightlifter Laurel Hubbard celebrates completing a lift at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Australia. Hubbard has been named to New Zealand's team at the Tokyo Olympics, making her the first openly transgender competitor at the Olympics. Dan Mullan/Getty Images hide caption

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson speaks at a campaign rally at a gun store in October in Lee's Summit, Mo. Parson has signed into law a measure that could fine state and local law enforcement officers $50,000 for helping to enforce federal gun laws. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

MacKenzie Scott, the former wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, is shown here in 2018. The billionaire philanthropist has so far given away more than $8 billion of her fortune in three rounds of funding. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Australian softball players, the first foreign team to arrive for the Tokyo Olympic Games, wave from their bus after arriving at Narita International Airport on June 1. Eugene Hoshiko/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan in 2018 at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen has received federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

The FDA Has Approved A New Alzheimer's Drug — Here's Why That's Controversial

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Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos announced he'll be on board a spaceflight next month in a capsule attached to a rocket made by his space exploration company Blue Origin. Bezos is seen here in 2019. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thousands of pages of Dr. Anthony Fauci's work emails from January to June 2020 have been released via Freedom of Information Act requests by news organizations. Fauci is seen here before he testifies in front of a Senate committee last June. Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Amazon's Echo Show devices are among those that will automatically be added to its shared wireless network scheme, called Amazon Sidewalk. Amazon hide caption

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Amazon

Your Amazon Echo Will Share Your Wireless Network With Neighbors, Unless You Opt Out

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Smoke billows from the Singapore-registered container ship X-Press Pearl on Wednesday. The ship carries more than 80 containers of dangerous goods, including 25 tons of nitric acid. Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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"Pronouns are basically how we identify ourselves apart from our name. It's how someone refers to you in conversation," says Mary Emily O'Hara, a communications officer at GLAAD. "And when you're speaking to people, it's a really simple way to affirm their identity." Kaz Fantone for NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone for NPR

Japan's Naomi Osaka eyes the ball as she serves during the first round of the French Open tennis tournament Sunday in Paris. Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine, seen here in 2019, announced Tuesday that Washington is suing Amazon for alleged antitrust violations. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Protesters hold images of Belarus strongman Alexander Lukashenko, Belarus opposition activist Roman Protasevich and Protasevich's partner Sofia Sapega during a demonstration of Belarusians living in Poland and Poles supporting them in front of European Commission office in Warsaw on Monday. Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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