Lauren Frayer Lauren Frayer is NPR's international correspondent based in Mumbai, India.
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Lauren Frayer

Lauren Frayer

International Correspondent, Mumbai, India

Lauren Frayer covers India for NPR News. In June 2018, she opened a new NPR bureau in India's biggest city, its financial center, and the heart of Bollywood—Mumbai.

Before moving to India, Lauren was a regular freelance contributor to NPR for seven years, based in Madrid. During that time, she substituted for NPR bureau chiefs in Seoul, London, Istanbul, Islamabad, and Jerusalem. She also served as a guest host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

In Europe, Lauren chronicled the economic crisis in Spain & Portugal, where youth unemployment spiked above 50%. She profiled a Portuguese opera singer-turned protest leader, and a 90-year-old survivor of the Spanish Civil War, exhuming her father's remains from a 1930s-era mass grave. From Paris, Lauren reported live on NPR's Morning Edition, as French police moved in on the Charlie Hebdo terror suspects. In the fall of 2015, Lauren spent nearly two months covering the flow of migrants & refugees across Hungary & the Balkans – and profiled a Syrian rapper among them. She interviewed a Holocaust survivor who owed his life to one kind stranger, and managed to get a rare interview with the Dutch far-right leader Geert Wilders – by sticking her microphone between his bodyguards in the Hague.

Farther afield, she introduced NPR listeners to a Pakistani TV evangelist, a Palestinian surfer girl in Gaza, and K-pop performers campaigning in South Korea's presidential election.

Lauren has also contributed to The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and the BBC.

Her international career began in the Middle East, where she was an editor on the Associated Press' Middle East regional desk in Cairo, and covered the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war in Syria and southern Lebanon. In 2007, she spent a year embedded with U.S. troops in Iraq, an assignment for which the AP nominated her and her colleagues for a Pulitzer Prize.

On a break from journalism, Lauren drove a Land Rover across Africa for a year, from Cairo to Cape Town, sleeping in a tent on the car's roof. She once made the front page of a Pakistani newspaper, simply for being a woman commuting to work in Islamabad on a bicycle.

Born and raised in a suburb of New York City, Lauren holds a bachelor's degree in philosophy from The College of William & Mary in Virginia. She speaks Spanish, Portuguese, rusty French and Arabic, and is now learning Hindi.

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Story Archive

Workers sort onions at a wholesale market in Maharashtra. The state is India's biggest onion producer. Prices have fallen drastically because of a surplus and fewer exports. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

'I Rue The Day We Ever Became Farmers': In Rural India, A Struggle To Survive

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As Food Prices Drop, India's Farmers Are Demanding Changes From The Government

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Hindu holy men sample the sacred waters, which are believed to be restorative, with the power to cleanse sin. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Welcome To The World's Largest Gathering Of Humans

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Millions Of Hindus Gather For Traditional Dip In Holy River

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Women Entering A Sacred Temple Spark Protests In India

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A laborer climbs a tree to pluck coconuts at a farm in India. Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kerala Needs Coconut Pickers — So Women Are Stepping In (And Climbing Up)

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Devotees of Lord Ayyappa, the deity of the Sabarimala temple in India's Kerala state, protest a Supreme Court verdict in Ahmadabad, India, in October. The temple had barred women of menstruating age from entering the temple, but India's Supreme Court struck down the ban. Ajit Solanki/AP hide caption

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India's Supreme Court Orders Hindu Temple To Open Doors To Women, But Devotees Object

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Nuns and supporters demand the arrest of Bishop Franco Mulakkal, outside the High Court in Kochi in the southern Indian state of Kerala in September. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Nun In India Accuses A Bishop Of Rape, And Divides The Country's Christians

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Nearly 10 Years After The Mumbai Terror Attacks, Maritime Security Has Improved

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Newlyweds Saumil and Zarina Shah stayed at a safe house in New Delhi run by the Love Commandos, a group that rescues interfaith and inter-caste couples from potential violence and helps them hide from their families. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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When India's Interfaith Couples Encounter Threats, 'Love Commandos' Come To Their Aid

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In this undated photo released by the Anthropological Survey of India, Sentinelese tribe men row their canoe near India's Andaman and Nicobar archipelago. Anthropological Survey of India/AP hide caption

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Anthropological Survey of India/AP

An Indian farmer burns rice stalks after harvesting the crop in fields on the outskirts of Amritsar in Punjab. Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What Will Persuade Rice Farmers In Punjab To Stop Setting Fires In Their Fields?

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Members of the Sri Lankan parliament shout slogans in support of former Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe during a parliament session in Colombo on Wednesday that ousted his successor, Mahinda Rajapaksa. Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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