Lauren Frayer Lauren Frayer is NPR's international correspondent based in Mumbai, India.
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Lauren Frayer

Lauren Frayer

International Correspondent, Mumbai, India

Lauren Frayer covers India for NPR News. In June 2018, she opened a new NPR bureau in India's biggest city, its financial center, and the heart of Bollywood—Mumbai.

Before moving to India, Lauren was a regular freelance contributor to NPR for seven years, based in Madrid. During that time, she substituted for NPR bureau chiefs in Seoul, London, Istanbul, Islamabad, and Jerusalem. She also served as a guest host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

In Europe, Lauren chronicled the economic crisis in Spain & Portugal, where youth unemployment spiked above 50%. She profiled a Portuguese opera singer-turned protest leader, and a 90-year-old survivor of the Spanish Civil War, exhuming her father's remains from a 1930s-era mass grave. From Paris, Lauren reported live on NPR's Morning Edition, as French police moved in on the Charlie Hebdo terror suspects. In the fall of 2015, Lauren spent nearly two months covering the flow of migrants & refugees across Hungary & the Balkans – and profiled a Syrian rapper among them. She interviewed a Holocaust survivor who owed his life to one kind stranger, and managed to get a rare interview with the Dutch far-right leader Geert Wilders – by sticking her microphone between his bodyguards in the Hague.

Farther afield, she introduced NPR listeners to a Pakistani TV evangelist, a Palestinian surfer girl in Gaza, and K-pop performers campaigning in South Korea's presidential election.

Lauren has also contributed to The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and the BBC.

Her international career began in the Middle East, where she was an editor on the Associated Press' Middle East regional desk in Cairo, and covered the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war in Syria and southern Lebanon. In 2007, she spent a year embedded with U.S. troops in Iraq, an assignment for which the AP nominated her and her colleagues for a Pulitzer Prize.

On a break from journalism, Lauren drove a Land Rover across Africa for a year, from Cairo to Cape Town, sleeping in a tent on the car's roof. She once made the front page of a Pakistani newspaper, simply for being a woman commuting to work in Islamabad on a bicycle.

Born and raised in a suburb of New York City, Lauren holds a bachelor's degree in philosophy from The College of William & Mary in Virginia. She speaks Spanish, Portuguese, rusty French and Arabic, and is now learning Hindi.

Story Archive

India Says New 'Delta Plus' Coronavirus Variant May Be More Transmissible

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India Hits Lowest Daily COVID-19 Tally In 3 Months

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COVID-19 Cases Falling In India, But Disrupted Health System Still Causing Deaths

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As Lockdowns Lift In India, Vaccination Becomes Next Big Challenge

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The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in a standoff with social media companies over what content gets investigated or blocked online, and who gets to decide. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

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Bikas Das/AP

India And Tech Companies Clash Over Censorship, Privacy And 'Digital Colonialism'

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India Demands Social Media Firms Help It Track Misinformation Online

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Villagers wait to board a bus to head home in the wake of government-imposed restrictions relating to COVID-19 in Kathmandu valley. Rojan Shrestha/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Rojan Shrestha/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How COVID Spiraled Out Of Control In Nepal

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India's COVID-19 Outbreak Has Spread To Nepal

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Thousands In India Infected By Rare 'Black Fungus' With 50% Mortality Rate

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Medical attendant Gurmesh Kumawat prepares to administer supplemental oxygen to a coronavirus patient in the emergency ward at the BDM Government Hospital in mid-May in Kotputli, India. Rebecca Conway/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Conway/Getty Images

COVID-19 Has Pushed India's Junior Doctors To Their Limits

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Rains have washed away the top layer of sand of shallow graves at a cremation ground on the banks of the Ganges River in Shringverpur, northwest of Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India. Coronavirus testing is limited in parts of rural India, but some of the people buried there are believed to have died of COVID-19. Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images hide caption

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Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images

In Rural India, Less COVID-19 Testing, More Fear — And A Few Ventilators For Millions

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India's New Doctors Have Seen Immeasurable Grief During The Pandemic

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World's Biggest Vaccine Producer Says It Won't Export Doses Until End Of 2021

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Richa Srivastava (rear left) with her husband, Shalabh Pradhan (rear right), and their two fathers, Sudheer Kumar Pradhan (front left) and Sheo Prakash Srivastava (front right), in an undated family photo. The two family patriarchs died within three days of one another in April. Pradhan Family hide caption

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Pradhan Family

They Returned To India To Be Near Their Fathers, But Lost Them Both To COVID-19

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