Lauren Frayer Lauren Frayer is NPR's international correspondent based in Mumbai, India.
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Lauren Frayer

Lauren Frayer

International Correspondent, Mumbai, India

Lauren Frayer covers India for NPR News. In June 2018, she opened a new NPR bureau in India's biggest city, its financial center, and the heart of Bollywood—Mumbai.

Before moving to India, Lauren was a regular freelance contributor to NPR for seven years, based in Madrid. During that time, she substituted for NPR bureau chiefs in Seoul, London, Istanbul, Islamabad, and Jerusalem. She also served as a guest host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

In Europe, Lauren chronicled the economic crisis in Spain & Portugal, where youth unemployment spiked above 50%. She profiled a Portuguese opera singer-turned protest leader, and a 90-year-old survivor of the Spanish Civil War, exhuming her father's remains from a 1930s-era mass grave. From Paris, Lauren reported live on NPR's Morning Edition, as French police moved in on the Charlie Hebdo terror suspects. In the fall of 2015, Lauren spent nearly two months covering the flow of migrants & refugees across Hungary & the Balkans – and profiled a Syrian rapper among them. She interviewed a Holocaust survivor who owed his life to one kind stranger, and managed to get a rare interview with the Dutch far-right leader Geert Wilders – by sticking her microphone between his bodyguards in the Hague.

Farther afield, she introduced NPR listeners to a Pakistani TV evangelist, a Palestinian surfer girl in Gaza, and K-pop performers campaigning in South Korea's presidential election.

Lauren has also contributed to The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and the BBC.

Her international career began in the Middle East, where she was an editor on the Associated Press' Middle East regional desk in Cairo, and covered the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war in Syria and southern Lebanon. In 2007, she spent a year embedded with U.S. troops in Iraq, an assignment for which the AP nominated her and her colleagues for a Pulitzer Prize.

On a break from journalism, Lauren drove a Land Rover across Africa for a year, from Cairo to Cape Town, sleeping in a tent on the car's roof. She once made the front page of a Pakistani newspaper, simply for being a woman commuting to work in Islamabad on a bicycle.

Born and raised in a suburb of New York City, Lauren holds a bachelor's degree in philosophy from The College of William & Mary in Virginia. She speaks Spanish, Portuguese, rusty French and Arabic, and is now learning Hindi.

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Security personnel stand guard at St. Anthony's Church on April 24 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The church was among three targeted in this year's Easter Sunday attacks. Atul Loke/Getty Images hide caption

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Before Sri Lanka's Easter Attacks, Muslims' Warnings About Terrorism Went Unheeded

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Protests After Indian Lawmakers Pass Citizenship Bill

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New Controversial Law In India Uses Religion As A Criteria For Citizenship

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43 People Die In Factory Fire In Old Quarter Of New Delhi

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His Warning Could Have Stopped Sri Lanka Easter Attack. Now He Lies In The Hospital

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People celebrate after police shot dead four detained gang-rape and murder suspects in Shadnagar, near Hyderabad, India, on Friday. Sam Panthaky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Men Accused Of Gang Rape And Murder Killed In Police Custody In India

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Protests Erupt In India After Alleged Rape And Killing Of A Female Veterinarian

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Ilagan Udaya Kumari (from left), 50, whose husband went missing; Analaxmi Ariaratnam, 70, whose son disappeared; and Sangara Pilay Vanalogini, 53, whose son went missing. Mothers and other relatives of some of the tens of thousands of people who disappeared in Sri Lanka's 26-year civil war have been protesting in Vavuniya, Sri Lanka, to raise awareness of their plight. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Sri Lanka's Front-Runner Strikes Fear Among Tamils Who Blame Him For Disappearances

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Sri Lanka's Civil War Still Vivid As Voters Head To Polls For Presidential Election

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Flanked by Buddhist monks, the Dalai Lama, 84, greets visitors in September at a prayer ceremony at his monastery in Dharamsala, India. NPR hide caption

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Who Will Decide On The Dalai Lama's Successor — His Supporters Or Beijing?

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A woman rolls tobacco inside a tendu leaf to make a beedi cigarette at her home in Kannauj, Uttar Pradesh, India, on Wednesday, June 3, 2015. India's smokers favor cheaper options such as chewing and leaf-wrapped tobacco over cigarettes. Udit Kulshrestha/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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India Banned E-Cigarettes — But Beedis And Chewing Tobacco Remain Widespread

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Vaping Is Not Widespread In India But Other Forms Of Tobacco Are

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Indian spiritual and political leader Mohandas Gandhi circa 1935. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Gandhi Is Deeply Revered, But His Attitudes On Race And Sex Are Under Scrutiny

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