Lauren Frayer Lauren Frayer is NPR's international correspondent based in Mumbai, India.
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Lauren Frayer

Lauren Frayer

International Correspondent, Mumbai, India

Lauren Frayer covers India for NPR News. In June 2018, she opened a new NPR bureau in India's biggest city, its financial center, and the heart of Bollywood—Mumbai.

Before moving to India, Lauren was a regular freelance contributor to NPR for seven years, based in Madrid. During that time, she substituted for NPR bureau chiefs in Seoul, London, Istanbul, Islamabad, and Jerusalem. She also served as a guest host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

In Europe, Lauren chronicled the economic crisis in Spain & Portugal, where youth unemployment spiked above 50%. She profiled a Portuguese opera singer-turned protest leader, and a 90-year-old survivor of the Spanish Civil War, exhuming her father's remains from a 1930s-era mass grave. From Paris, Lauren reported live on NPR's Morning Edition, as French police moved in on the Charlie Hebdo terror suspects. In the fall of 2015, Lauren spent nearly two months covering the flow of migrants & refugees across Hungary & the Balkans – and profiled a Syrian rapper among them. She interviewed a Holocaust survivor who owed his life to one kind stranger, and managed to get a rare interview with the Dutch far-right leader Geert Wilders – by sticking her microphone between his bodyguards in the Hague.

Farther afield, she introduced NPR listeners to a Pakistani TV evangelist, a Palestinian surfer girl in Gaza, and K-pop performers campaigning in South Korea's presidential election.

Lauren has also contributed to The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and the BBC.

Her international career began in the Middle East, where she was an editor on the Associated Press' Middle East regional desk in Cairo, and covered the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah war in Syria and southern Lebanon. In 2007, she spent a year embedded with U.S. troops in Iraq, an assignment for which the AP nominated her and her colleagues for a Pulitzer Prize.

On a break from journalism, Lauren drove a Land Rover across Africa for a year, from Cairo to Cape Town, sleeping in a tent on the car's roof. She once made the front page of a Pakistani newspaper, simply for being a woman commuting to work in Islamabad on a bicycle.

Born and raised in a suburb of New York City, Lauren holds a bachelor's degree in philosophy from The College of William & Mary in Virginia. She speaks Spanish, Portuguese, rusty French and Arabic, and is now learning Hindi.

Story Archive

India still counts on coal for its power. And that could be a problem

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India marks its 1 billionth COVID vaccination — but the fight is far from over

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Sharmistha Chaudhuri (center, wearing pink), 35, at her wedding in Kolkata, India, in January 2019. Chaudhuri found some Indian wedding traditions retrograde, so she hired four feminist priestesses to officiate at hers. They performed a multilingual, egalitarian ceremony stripped of patriarchal traditions. Sharmistha Chaudhuri hide caption

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Sharmistha Chaudhuri

Hindu priestesses fight the patriarchy, one Indian wedding at a time

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The family which founded Air India regains control with a $2.4 billion bid

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A civil rights activist holds a placard during a 2020 demonstration in Bengaluru, India, condemning the proposal in several states of laws against so-called "love jihad." That's an unfounded conspiracy theory spread by Hindu nationalists who accuse Muslim men of wooing Hindu women in order to force them to convert to Islam. Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images

Members Of Quad Summit Will Discuss Ways To Counter China's Rise

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The last Quad meeting, in March, was virtual. President Biden, Yoshihide Suga, Japan's prime minister (top right), Scott Morrison, Australia's prime minister (bottom left), and Narendra Modi, India's prime minister, will meet in person in the U.S. on Friday. Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Farmers In India Are Trying To Revive Their Protests Against Agriculture Deregulation

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India's New Laws Against 'Love Jihad' Give Hindu Conservatives Power To Halt Weddings

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A New Law In India Is Making It Harder For Interfaith Couples To Get Married

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The main entrance to the campus of the Darul Uloom seminary in Deoband, India, where the Deobandi strain of Islam was founded in the 19th century. Among its more recent adherents are the Taliban. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

The Taliban's Ideology Has Surprising Roots In British-Ruled India

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People evacuated from Kabul arrive at Hindon Air Force base near New Delhi, on Sunday. Despite entreaties from the Taliban, India choose to evacuate its diplomats earlier this month. AP hide caption

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AP

With The U.S. Exit From Afghanistan, India Fears An Increasingly Hostile Region

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Afghanistan's Neighboring Countries Try To Predict The Future Of Relations

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